Bleeding from the Lungs. Herb Tea for

January 1st, 2009

“Two ounces each of bistory root, tormentil root, oak bark, and comfrey root, boil in three quarts of water down to one pint, strain and add one tablespoonful of ground ginger. Give a wine glass full every half hour until relieved. Place the feet in hot mustard water, keep the bowels open with a little senna and ginger tea and if necessary give a vapor bath”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Remedy (external application) for Piles

September 28th, 2008

Inner bark of the white oak tree, boil and strain, and boil again until you obtain 1/2 pint of the extract, very thick; then add 1/2 pint of the oil of the oldest and strongest bacon you can procure; simmer together until a union takes place when cold. Then apply by the finger up the rectum every night until well. Be very strict to abstain from strong and stimulating diet. The above is a sure cure for blind or bleeding piles, in all cases, sooner or later.

Source: Dr Chase’s Recipes, or Information for Everybody, A.W. Chase

Doctor Gifford’s Amber Pills for a Consumption

May 18th, 2008

Take of Venice Turpentine one ounce washed, and six grains of the powder of white Amber, mix them together, and set them on a clean pot upon Embers, and let it not stand too hot; to try whether it be enough, take a drop, and let it cool; if after it is cold it be stiff, and will not cleave to the finger, it is enough; then take of the powders of Pearl, White Amber, and Coral, of each a quantity, as a quarter of an ounce, of the inner bark of an Oak a quarter of an ounce; of Cinamon, and Nutmegs, of each as much, and three ounces of hard white Sugar; make all these into a powder, and seethe them, and put the pills into them; before you take them, you must be well purged, after which you must take three of the aforesaid pills wrapped up in the Powder, what else you will, & in the morning take the yolk of a new laid Egg warmed a little, and put into it as much of the powder as will be on a shilling, and sup it off; let this be used some time together, and there will be great benefit found by it.

The Queens Cabinet Opened: Or, The Pearle of Practice. Accurate, Physical and Chirurgical Receipts, Nathaniel Brooke

Techniques: Decoction

January 1st, 2008

Decoction, or boiling, is employed to extract the mucilaginous or gummy parts of substances, their bitter, astringent or other qualities, and is nothing more than boiling the ingredients in a saucepan with the lid slightly raised. Be sure never to use an iron saucepan for astringent decoctions, such as oak-bark, galls, &c., as they will turn the saucepan black and spoil the decoction. The enamelled saucepans are very useful for decoctions, but an excellent plan is to put the ingredients into a jar and then boil the jar, thus preparing it by a water bath, as it is technically termed; or by using a common pipkin, which answers still better. No decoction should be allowed to boil for more than ten minutes.

Source: Enquire Within Upon Everything.