A Hair Tonic

October 18th, 2019

Scald two ounces of black tea in one gallon of boiling water; add three ounces of glycerine, one quart of bay rum and half an ounce of the tincture of cantharides; scald for five minutes longer; strain and bottle. This will prevent the hair from falling out, and at the same time will stimulate a new and healthy growth.

Source: The Kentucky Housewife, Mrs Peter A. White

For A Cough

April 26th, 2019

Make a strong tea of hoarhound; then strain it, and add half a pound of the best loaf sugar, to a pint of the tea: let it simmer till thick; then bottle it, and take a little two or three times a day.

Source: The Philadelphia Housewife, Mary Hodgson

To Stop The Flow Of Blood

April 22nd, 2019

Bind the cut with cobwebs and brown sugar, pressed on like lint. Or, if you cannot procure these, with the fine dust of tea. When the blood ceases to flow, apply laudanum.

Source: Common Sense in the Household, Marion Harland

For A Sore Throat or Mouth

April 12th, 2019

Make a sage tea by boiling some sage leaves; when strong, add honey and some alum or borax. Gargle the throat with this often through the day.

Source: The Philadelphia Housewife, Mary Hodgson

Slippery-Elm Bark Tea

March 25th, 2019

Break the bark into bits, pour boiling water over it, cover and let it infuse until cold. Sweeten, ice, and take for summer disorders, or add lemon-juice and drink for a bad cold.

Source: Common Sense in the Household, Marion Harland

Sulphur Tea for the Hair

March 15th, 2019

There is nothing better than sulphur tea for the hair. It cures dandruff, promotes the growth, makes the hair soft and glossy and is very good to keep the hair from turning gray.

Source: The Just-Wed Cook Book

Herb Teas

March 7th, 2019

Herb teas are made by infusing the dried or green leaves and stalks in boiling water, and letting them stand until cold. Sweeten to taste.

Sage tea, sweetened with honey, is good for a sore throat, used as a gargle, with a small bit of alum dissolved in it.

Catnip tea is the best panacea for infant ills, in the way of cold and colic, known to nurses.

Pennyroyal tea will often avert the unpleasant consequences of a sudden check of perspiration, or the evils induced by ladies’ thin shoes.

Chamomile and gentian teas are excellent tonics taken either cold or hot.

The tea made from blackberry-root is said to be good for summer disorders. That from green strawberry leaves is an admirable and soothing wash for a cankered mouth.

Tea of parsley-root scraped and steeped in boiling water, taken warm, will often cure strangury and kindred affections, as will that made from dried pumpkin-seed.

Tansy and rue teas are useful in cases of colic, as are fennel seeds steeped in brandy.

A tea of damask-rose leaves, dry or fresh, will usually subdue any simple case of summer complaint in infants.

Mint tea, made from the green leaves, crushed in cold or hot water and sweetened, is palatable and healing to the stomach and bowels.

Source: Common Sense in the Household, Marion Harland

Eye Lotions

March 3rd, 2019
  1. Dissolve 100 grs of boric acid in 6 oz water.
  2. Add one teaspoonful Condy’s fluid to 10 oz water.
  3. Dissolve 30 grs alum and 10 grs sulphate of zinc in 10 oz water.
  4. Goulard water.
  5. Cold tea. Useful in cases of slight inflammation.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Complexion Wash

August 15th, 2018

Put in a vial one drachm of benzoin gum in powder, one drachm nutmeg oil, six drops of orange-blossom tea, or apple blossoms put in half pint of rain-water and boiled down to one teaspoonful and strained, one pint of sherry wine. Bathe the face morning and night; will remove all flesh-worms and freckles, and give a beautiful complexion. Or, put one ounce of powdered gum of benzoin in a pint of whisky; to use, put in water in wash-bowl till it is milky, allowing it to dry without wiping. This is perfectly harmless.

Cream cures sun-burn on some complexions, lemon juice is best on others, and cold water suits still others best.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Tea and Coffee Stains

August 3rd, 2018

Only a few people know that butter will remove tea, coffee or fruit stains. It should be rubbed on the linen or cotton and then the material should be soaked in hot water and a mild soap. In fact, any stains, except ink or wine stains, sprinkle salt over the spots and pour boiling water through it until the spot has gone.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames