Dysentery

January 1st, 2017

Make a strong tea of sweet gum bark ; to a pint, add a gill of good brandy, half an ounce of laudanum, a little loaf sugar to make it palatable. Take a teaspoonful every hour until the effect of the laudanum is apparent, then at longer intervals, until the disease abates.

A very good and simple remedy, if used when the first symptoms appear, is : Give an adult five drops of spirits of turpentine
in a teaspoonful of sweet milk. Repeat, if necessary. Give a child according to age.

Another remedy : A teacup half full of apple vinegar. Dissolve as much salt in it as it will hold, leaving a little at the bottom. Pour boiling water upon the solution until the cup is three-fourths full. Scald it, and remove the scum. Take a tablespoonful three times a day.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Cough Syrup

December 6th, 2016

One cup of hops, one cup of wild cherry bark, one cup of hoarhound, one and a half gills of tar, one gill of brandy and a half pound of loaf sugar. Soak the cherry bark in one pint of water twenty-eight hours; put the hops and hoarhound in two quarts of water and keep at a temperature below (but near) boiling for two hours; boil tar with one pint of water one hour; strain the hops and hoarhound; pour off the tar into the same vessel; add sugar and one pint of water; boil until you have> a rich syrup; then add the cherry and brandy, and make up for the water that has been lost. Caution.—Do not boil the cherry.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Blackberry Syrup

February 18th, 2016

Half a pound of blackberry root, and one-half pound of white oak bark, cut into small pieces or pulverized, and boiled in one gallon of water until it is reduced to two quarts, then strain, and boil up with cloves, cinnamon and pepper, and enough sugar to make a thick syrup. Add one gill best French brandy to each quart. Bottle and seal with wax, when it will keep for years. This was used most successfully during the late war, in cases of dysentery.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Slippery-Elm Bark Tea

September 21st, 2015

Break the bark into bits, pour boiling water over it, cover and let it infuse until cold. Sweeten, ice, and take for summer disorders, or add lemon juice and drink for a bad cold.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Stomachic Tincture

August 28th, 2015

Bruise a couple of ounces of Peruvian bark, one of bitter dried orange peel. Steep them in a pint of proof spirit a fortnight, shaking up the bottle that contains it once or twice every day. Let it remain untouched for a couple of days, then decant the bitter into another bottle. A tea-spoonful of this, in a wine glass of water, is a fine tonic.

Source: The American Housewife

Ingredient: Angustura Bark

May 13th, 2015

Angustura bark (Cusparia) is a valuable tonic, especially in cases of dyspepsia, with diarrhoea and loss of appetite. It may be given in powder in doses of ten grains, twice or thrice a-day; or in infusion, or decoction. In cases of flatulency of the stomach, attended by nausea, five grains, with the same weight of rhubarb, taken an hour before dinner, will often effectually restore the appetite and digestion.

Source: A Companion To The Medicine Chest, John Savory.

Falling of the Womb, White Oak Bark for

April 13th, 2015

“A mild infusion of white oak bark, or of alum or tannin, used in quantities of a pint, as a douche, will often give immediate relief.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Warts and Corns

April 12th, 2015

The bark of the common willow burnt to ashes, mixed with strong vinegar and applied to the parts, will remove all warts, corns, and other excrescences.

Source: The Ladies’ Book of Useful Information

Ingredient: Pomegranate Bark

April 10th, 2015

The chief use of this bark is as an astringent in chronic diarrhoea and in dysentery, and as an injection in fluor albus. It has, also, been much used in India as a remedy for tape-worm, for which a decoction is prepared with two ounces of the fresh bark, boiled in a pint and a half of water until only three quarters of a pint remain. The worm is frequently voided after the first dose of two ounces; but the same quantity may be repeated for six or seven times in succession, at intervals of an hour.

Source: A Companion To The Medicine Chest, John Savory.

Remedy for Chapped Hands

March 17th, 2015

The simplest remedy is the camphor ball, to be obtained of all chemists. Powdered hemlock bark put into a piece of muslin and sprinkled on the chaps is highly recommended. Or, wash with oatmeal, and afterwards rub the hands over with dry oatmeal, so as to remove all dampness. It is a good thing to rub the hands and lips with glycerine before going to bed at night. A good oil is made by simmering: Sweet oil, one pint; Venice turpentine, three ounces; lard, half a pound; beeswax, three ounces. Simmer till the wax is melted. Rub on, or apply with a rag.

Source: The Ladies’ Book Of Useful Information