Toilet Items

October 10th, 2017

Mutton tallow is considered excellent to soften the hands. It may be rubbed on at any time when the hands are perfectly dry, but the best time is when retiring, and an old pair of soft, large gloves thoroughly covered on the inside with the tallow and glycerine in equal parts, melted together, can be worn during the night with the most satisfactory results.

Four parts of glycerine and five parts of yolks of eggs thoroughly mixed, and applied after washing the hands, is also considered excellent.

For chapped hands or face: One ounce of glycerine, one ounce of alcohol mixed, then add eight ounces of rose-water.

Another good rule is to rub well in dry oatmeal after every washing, and be particular regarding the quality of soap. Cheap soap and hard water are the unknown enemies of many people, and the cause of rough skin and chapped hands. Castile soap and rain-water will sometimes cure without any other assistance.

Camphor ice is also excellent, and can be applied with but little inconvenience. Borax dissolved and added to the toilet water is also good.

For chapped lips, beeswax dissolved in a small quantity of sweet oil, by heating carefully. Apply the salve two or three times a day, and avoid wetting the lips as much as possible.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Broth for Sick and Convalescent Persons

July 24th, 2017

Put a Crag-end of a Neck of Mutton, a Knuckle of Veal, and a Pullet into a Pipkin of water, with a spoonful or two of French-barley first scalded in a water or two. The Pullet is put in after the other meat is well skimmed, and hath boiled an hour. A good hour after that, put in a large quantity of Sorrel, Lettice, Purslane, Borage and Bugloss, and boil an hour more at least three hours in all. Before you put in the herbs, season the broth with Salt, a little Pepper and Cloves, strain out the broth and drink it.

But for Potage, put at first a good piece of fleshy young Beef with the rest of the meat. And put not in your herbs till half an hour before you take off the Pot. When you use not herbs, but Carrots and Turneps, put in a little Peny-royal and a sprig of Thyme. Vary in the season with Green-pease, or Cucumber quartered longwise, or Green sower Verjuyce Grapes; always well-seasoned with Pepper and Salt and Cloves. You pour some of the broth upon the sliced-bread by little and little, stewing it, before you put the Herbs upon the Potage.

The best way of ordering your bread in Potages, is thus. Take light spungy fine white French-bread, cut only the crusts into tosts. Tost them exceeding dry before the fire, so that they be yellow. Then put them hot into a hot dish, and pour upon them some very good strong broth, boiling hot. Cover this, and let them stew together gently, not boil; and feed it with fresh-broth, still as it needeth; This will make the bread swell much, and become like gelly.

Source: The Closet Of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened, K. Digby

Soft Soap

February 28th, 2017

All mutton and ham fat should be melted and strained into a large stone pot. The practice of throwing lumps of fat into a pot, and waiting till there are several pounds before trying them out, is a disgusting one, as often such a receptacle is alive with maggots. Try out the fat, and strain as carefully as you would lard or beef drippings, and it is then always ready for use. If concentrated lye or potash, which comes in little tins, is used, directions will be found on the tins. Otherwise allow a pound of stone potash to every pound of grease. Twelve pounds of each will make a barrel of soft soap.

Crack the potash in small pieces. Put in a large kettle with two gallons of water, and boil till dissolved. Then add the grease, and, when melted, pour all into a tight barrel. Fill it up with boiling water, and for a week, stir daily for five or ten minutes. It will gradually become like jelly.

Source: The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, H. Campbell

Grandmother’s Salve for Everything

August 2nd, 2016

Two pounds of rosin, a half teacup of mutton tallow after it is hard, half as much bees-wax and a half ounce of camphor gum. Put all together into an old kettle and let it dissolve and just come to a boil, stirring with a stick; then take a half pail of warm water (just the chill off), pour it in and stir carefully until you can get your hands around it. Two persons must each take half and
pull like candy until quite white and brittle; put a little grease on your hands to prevent sticking and keep them wet all the time; wet the table, roll out the salve and cut it with a knife. Keep in a cool place.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Ointment to Soften the Hands

March 25th, 2016

One and a half pound of mutton tallow, one ounce of camphor gum, one ounce of glycerine, melted; when thoroughly mixed put away to cool. Rub on at night.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

An Excellent Remedy for Cough

August 6th, 2015

An excellent remedy for cough is made as follows: Take a cup of mutton tallow and two great spoonfuls of spirits of turpentine; put into the turpentine all the camphor gum that it will dissolve, then add to the cup of tallow, melted, mix thoroughly, and keep where you can have it ready to apply to the throat or chest on a cloth when needed, covering warmly. This gives almost instant relief. It is a remedy of one of our best and oldest physicians, who has saved many lives by its use. It is good for any lung trouble, croup, or colds.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Frozen Feet – To Cure

May 1st, 2015

Get some lumps of fresh lime and make a foot-tub full of strong whitewash mixture, and immerse the feet in it as hot as may be borne. This remedy is to cure that disagreeable itching that troubles one after having frozen the feet. This itching will come on night after night and season after season. The relief will be instantaneous. Let them remain half an hour in the whitewash. They will be shriveled up but free from pain. Rub them briskly and great rolls of dead cuticle will peel off. Anoint with mutton tallow, put on some cotton stockings, and go to bed. Repeat the application if necessary, but it will require but two or three to effect a cure.

Source: Mrs Owens’ Cook Book and Useful Household Hints, Frances Owens

Flux

March 10th, 2015

Receive the smoke of Turpentine cast on burning coals. This cures also the Bloody Flux and the Falling of the Fundament.

Or put a large brown Toast into three quarts of water, with a drachm of cochineal powdered, and a drachm of salt of wormwood. Drink it all in as short time as you conveniently can. This rarely fails to cure all Fluxes, Cholera Morbus, yea, and inflammations of the bowels. Tried.

Or take a spoonful of Plantane-seed bruised, morning and evening till it stops.

Or ten grains of Ipecacuanha, three mornings successively. It is likewise excellent as a sudorific.

Or boil four ounces of rasped Logwood, or fresh Logwood chips, in three quarts of water to two; strain it, and drink a quarter of a pint, sweetened with loaf-sugar warm, twice a day. It both binds and heals. Or take a small tea-cupful of it every hour.

Or boil the fat of a breast of mutton in a quart of water for an hour. Drink the broth as soon as you can conveniently. This will cure the most inveterate flux. Tried.

Source: Primitive Physic: or an easy and natural method of curing most diseases, John Wesley.

Chilblains, To Cure

August 3rd, 2008

Mutton tallow and lard of each 3/4 lb; melt in an iron vessel and add hydrated oxide of iron 2 oz; stirring continually with an iron spoon, until the mass is of a uniform black colour; then let it cool and add Venice-turpentine 2 oz; and Armenian bole 1 oz; oil of bergamot 1 dram; rub up the bole with a little olive oil before putting it in.

Apply several times daily by putting it on lint or linen — heals the worst cases in a few days.

Source: Dr Chase’s Recipes, or Information for Everybody, A.W. Chase

Sores and Ulcers, Excellent Salve for

May 7th, 2008

“One tablespoon of melted mutton or even beef tallow while warm; add some spirits of turpentine and one teaspoonful of laudanum, stir well.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter