Sinapisms

December 11th, 2021

The sinapism is a poultice made of vinegar instead of milk, and rendered warm and stimulating by the addition of mustard, horseradish, or garlic. The common sinapism is made of equal quantities of bread crumbs and mustard, a sufficient quantity of strong vinegar, and mixing all together into a poultice. When a sinapism is required to be more stimulating, a little bruised garlic may be added. Sinapisms are employed to recal the blood and spirits to a weak part, as in the case of palsy; they are also of service in deep-seated pains, as in the case of sciatica. When the gout seizes the head or stomach, they are applied to the feet to bring the disorder down, and are likewise applied to the soles of the feet in a low state of fever. They should not be suffered to lie on till they have raised blisters, but till the parts become red, and will continue so when pressed with the finger.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Biliousness

September 14th, 2021

Take the juice of one, two or three lemons, according to appetite, in as much ice water as is pleasant to drink, without sugar, before going to bed at night. In the morning, on rising, or at least one-half hour before breakfast, take the juice of one lemon in a glass of water without sugar. The stomach should not be irritated by eating lemons clear, but they should be properly diluted so as not to burn or draw the throat.

Source: The Inglenook Cook Book

An Excellent Bitter

July 20th, 2021

Cut 1/2 oz. of gentian in thin slices into a stone jar, with the same quantity of fresh orange peel and sliced ginger. Pour over them 1 quart of boiling water, and let it stand ten hours. Strain it, add a gill of sherry, and bottle it. For a weak stomach, a wine-glassful the first thing in the morning will create an appetite.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Stomachic Tincture

June 20th, 2021

Bruise an ounce and a half of Peruvian bark, and one of bitter dried orange peel. Steep it in brandy or proof spirit, for a fortnight, shaking it each day. Let it remain for a couple of days without shaking it, then decant the liquor. A tea spoonful of it in a wine glass of water, is a fine tonic.

Source: The New England Cook Book

For Indigestion

June 2nd, 2021

1 handful senna leaves
2 teaspoonsful sugar
1 teaspoonful ground ginger
1 pint boiling water
2 teaspoonsful carbonate soda
1 teaspoonful essence of peppermint

Boil slowly, for 1/2 an hour, the senna, sugar, ginger, and soda, then strain and cool. When quite cold, put into a bottle with the essence of peppermint.

Take a wine-glass fasting, or before meals.

Source: The Northampton Cookery Book, M.A. Jeffery

Sick Headache

May 5th, 2021

Put one tablespoonful of ground mustard in a teacup, fill the cup with hot water and drink. This either settles the stomach or causes vomiting, either of which gives relief.

Source: The Inglenook Cook Book

Rhubarb, Tincture Of

March 17th, 2021

Rhubarb, two and a half ounces ; lesser cardamom seeds, half an ounce ; brandy, one quart. Digest for seven days, then strain. Dose : From one to three or four spoonfuls. Used for indigestion and weakness of the stomach.

Source: Recipes For The Million

Acidity of the Stomach

February 19th, 2021

This unpleasant disorder gives rise to heart-burn, flushings of the face, and other unpleasant sensations. It is most readily cured by taking two teaspoonfuls of magnesia in a tumbler of milk or water, the former is better.

Source: Recipes for the Million

For Bilious Complaints and Indigestion

May 6th, 2020

Pour over twenty grains each of rhubarb and ginger, and a handful of camomile flowers, a pint of boiling water. A wine-glassful the first in the morning, and an hour before dinner.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Mutton Custard

May 4th, 2020

1 quart of milk.
2 ounces of mutton suet.
Stick of cinnamon, 5 inches long.
1 tablespoonful of flour.
1/2 teaspoonful of salt.

The suet must be from the kidneys; sweet, and free from all tough membrane. Shred it very fine, and put it in the double-boiler with the cinnamon and milk; reserving, however, one gill of the milk. Cook for one hour, then strain. Return the strained liquid to the double-boiler, and place on the fire. Mix the flour and cold milk to a smooth paste, and stir into the hot mixture. Add the salt, and cook for ten minutes. Give the patient as much of this as he will willingly take; say, half a pint every four or five hours. Keep the patient warm and quiet. This is a particularly good remedy in severe cases of bowel and stomach trouble, being nourishing and soothing.

Source: Miss Parloa’s Young Housekeeper, Maria Parloa