To Break Up A Cold

December 31st, 2017

When you feel the first symptoms, take a Dover’s powder with a glass of hot lemonade or whisky punch, go to bed, wrap up warm, and by morning you will be entirely relieved. In addition the feet should be bathed in hot mustard water.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Corns

December 29th, 2017

For soft corn, apply vaseline.

For hard corn, apply iodine and remove pressure by using corn plaster.

For a very sore corn, use a bread poultice at night.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Chills

December 21st, 2017

Use heat. Apply hot-water bags under arms, on thighs and at feet. Give hot foot bath, in which is 1 tbsp. mustard. Rub limbs toward body, to restore circulation. Give hot coffee or tea, or hot lemonade. Wrap in blankets and put to bed. Chills indicate oncoming illness — see doctor!

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Colds

November 5th, 2017

At the first sign of “taking a cold” — use some simple remedy, such as inhaling camphor from time to time for several hours. Dampen the center of a handkerchief in water, and drop on it some spirit of camphor. Eat a sliced onion.

Take two drops of spirit of camphor on a tsp. sugar.

Or, drop five drops camphor in ½ tumbler of water. Take a tsp. every half hour.

Ginger tea is a much valued old-fashioned remedy. Pour boiling water over a tbsp. bruised ginger root. Let stand two hours. The dose is 1 tbsp. every hour or two.

If the “cold” continues, take a laxative, such as castor oil or rhubarb, and follow the dose with a hot foot bath at night and hot lemonade after getting into bed, to induce perspiration. Keep well covered.

If a cough comes with the cold, lemon juice and sugar syrup make a pleasant cough remedy; or molasses-and-vinegar syrup is liked by children. Mix in the proportion of 1 tbsp. vinegar to 2 tbsp. molasses.

Flaxseed tea will sometimes relieve a “tickling” cough. Pour 2 cups of boiling water over 1 tbsp. whole flaxseeds. Stir; let simmer gently one-half hour. Add juice of half a lemon, and sugar if desired. Take a tbsp. as often as wished.

If the chest is sore, rub it with camphorated oil, or ammonia liniment, which is made by shaking together in a bottle 4 tbsp. olive (sweet) oil and 1 tbsp. household ammonia. This hardens upon standing a few days — so it is best made as needed.

All these are simple home remedies, but if a cold is severe, see a doctor. A neglected cold is dangerous.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Chilblains

November 1st, 2017

Chilblains are the result of too rapid warming of cold parts, generally feet or fingers. Sometimes for years after being frost-bitten, exposure to severe cold will produce itching and burning, and perhaps swelling and ulcers.

Treatment:

Rub with turpentine or alcohol. The rubbing in itself is excellent. See doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Bunions

September 20th, 2017

Pulverize salt petre and sweet oil mixed well and applied to the sore joints often brings relief. Bunions are usually caused by wearing shoes too short.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

Corns

September 16th, 2017

Bind bread soaked in vinegar on the corns day and night and they will come out by the roots.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

For Corns

September 6th, 2017

Mix together a little Indian meal and cold water, till it is about the consistence of thick mush. Then bind it on the corn by wrapping a small slip of thin rag round the toe. It will not prevent you from wearing your shoe and stocking. In two or three hours take it off, and you will find the corn much softened. Cut off as much of it as is soft with a penknife or scissors. Then put on a fresh poultice, and repeat it till the corn is entirely levelled, as it will be after a few regular applications of the remedy; which will be found successful whenever the corn returns. There is no permanent cure for them.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

For Chilblains

August 27th, 2017

Dip the feet every night and morning in cold water, withdrawing them in a minute or two, and drying them by rubbing them very hard with a coarse towel. To put them immediately into a pail of brine brought from a pickle tub is another excellent remedy when feet are found to be frosted.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

Cramps in the Leg

August 17th, 2017

Sleep with hot water bag at the feet. A garter tied tightly around the leg often effects a cure. Quick, hard rubbing is best in sudden, painful attacks. Often it is essential to walk about the room to bring the circulation of blood to the feet again.

Source: Civic League Cook Book