Sore Gums

December 30th, 2016

Brandy and salt will remove soreness of the gums.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

To Remove Grease Spots

December 28th, 2016

Take the yolk of an egg, entirely free from the white, and with a soft brush apply it on the spot until the grease appears removed or dissolved. Wash off the egg with moderately warm water, and then rinse off the whole with clean cold water.

Another. Lay a quantity of Magnesia or French chalk on the grease spot, and apply to it a hot flatiron: repeat till it is all out.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

To Relieve A Cold

December 26th, 2016

At the very first symptoms, have the feet bathed upon going to bed, and take three grains of quinine (five grains is sometimes given), twenty drops of laudanum, in a tablespoonful of ginger tea or water. If not relieved by the first dose, repeat the next night. Two doses will generally relieve an obstinate cold.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Castor Oil Made Palatable

December 24th, 2016

Boil castor oil with twice its quantity of milk, and sweeten it with sugar. Let it cool. Children will not refuse it.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

For a Burn

December 22nd, 2016

Make half a tumbler of strong lime water, let it set a few minutes; then strain the water through a thin muslin to the same quantity of linseed or sweet oil (neat’s or hog’s foot will answer); mix it well, and spread over the burn; wrap over linen cloths. Do not remove the cloth for several days; saturate it frequently with the lime and oil until the inflammation is subdued. Should the odor become offensive, apply cold poultices of the flour of slippery elm; spread over with pulverized charcoal. A plaster of lard and soot is also good for a burn. Heal with any simple salve — a very good one is made by stewing together heart leaves, white lily root, agrimony, a few leaves of the Jamestown weed, and sweet gum. When the strength of the herbs is extracted, strain the water; throw away leaves, etc.; add fresh unsalted butter, and simmer gently until the water has evaporated. Keep this on hand for common sores, in a close-covered box.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Remedy for a Cough

December 20th, 2016

Five cents worth of rock candy, five cents worth of gum arabic, five cents worth of licorice, all dissolved in a pint of water over a slow fire. When cold add five cents worth of paregoric, and five cents worth of syrup of ipecac; bottle and take a teaspoonful several times a day.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

To Dress A Blister

December 18th, 2016

Clip the blisters; dress with a soft cloth covered with hog’s lard. Renew as necessary. Cabbage leaves are not now used.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Green Ointment

December 16th, 2016

Boil the leaves of Jamestown weed in water until a very strong tea is obtained; add good hog’s lard in the proportion of three pounds of lard to one gallon of the water. Stew until the water is evaporated. Strain, and to each pound add an ounce of turpentine; add it when the lard is nearly cold.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

For Corns

December 14th, 2016

The strongest acetic acid applied night and morning, will cure hard or soft corns in a week.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

For the Teeth

December 12th, 2016

A very agreeable dentifrice is made from an ounce of myrrh in fine powder, and a little powdered green sage, mixed with two spoonfuls of honey. The teeth should be washed with it every night and morning. Spite of all that is said against it, charcoal holds the highest place as a tooth-powder. It has the property, too, of opposing putrefaction, and destroying vices of the gums. It is most conveniently used when made into paste with honey.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook