Burns and Scalds

July 3rd, 2019

The great thing in treating these is to exclude air as quickly as possible from the wounded part. Oily substances are the most useful for the purpose. Carron oil (linseed oil and lime water in equal proportions) and carbolized oil (1 part of carbolic acid to 50 parts of olive oil) are among the best things to apply, and one or other of them should be kept in stock for emergencies. In their absence olive, linseed or castor oil, lard, vaseline, or cornflour will serve for an immediate application. It is better to use at once what is to hand than to waste time in searching for what might be more beneficial. On no account pull away clothing that sticks to the burn: soak it off with tepid water. Blisters are pricked before applying the dressing of strips of lint soaked in carron or carbolized oil, covered with a layer of cottonwool and held in place by bandages. Acid burns — Dust them over with whiting or powdered chalk to neutralize the acid; then wash in clean water and dress with oil. If no whiting, etc., be available, wash at once in water. Alkali burns — Neutralize alkali with vinegar; wash, and dress with oil. Severe burns cause a serious shock to the system, and a tendency to collapse, so the patient should be kept warm while the doctor is fetched.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Scalds and Burns

February 21st, 2019

The following facts cannot be too firmly impressed on the mind of the reader, that in either of these accidents the first, best and often the only remedies required, are sheets of wadding, fine wool, or carded cotton, and in the default of these, violet powder, flour, magnesia or chalk. The object for which these several articles are employed is the same in each instance; namely, to exclude the air from injured part; for if the air can be effectually shut out from the raw surface, and care is taken not to expose the tender part till the new cuticle is formed, the cure may be safely left to nature. The moment a person is called to a case of scald or burn, he should cover the part with a sheet, or a portion of a sheet, of wadding, taking care not to break any blister that may have formed, or stay to remove any burnt clothes that may adhere to the surface, but as quickly as possible envelope every part of the injury from all access of the air, laying one or two more pieces of wadding on the first, so as to effectually guard the burn or scald from the irritation of the atmosphere; and if the article used is wool or cotton, the same precaution, of adding more material where the surface is thinly covered, must be adopted; a light bandage finally securing all in their places. Any of the popular remedies recommended below may be employed when neither wool, cotton nor wadding are to be procured, it being always remembered that that article which will best exclude the air from a burn or scald is the best, quickest, and least painful mode of treatment. And in this respect nothing has surpassed cotton loose or attached to paper as in wadding.

If the Skin is Much Injured in burns, spread some linen pretty thickly with chalk ointment, and lay over the part, and give the patient some brandy and water if much exhausted; then send for a medical man. If not much injured, and very painful, use the same ointment, or apply carded cotton dipped in lime water and linseed oil. If you please, you may lay cloths dipped in ether over the parts, or cold lotions. Treat scalds in same manner, or cover with scraped raw potato; but the chalk ointment is the best. In the absence of all these, cover the injured part with treacle, and dust over it plenty of flour.

Source: One Thousand Secrets of Wise and Rich Men Revealed, C. A. Bogardus

Beer, Restoration of Spoiled

October 16th, 2018

I.—Powdered chalk is poured into the cask and allowed to remain in the beer until completely precipitated.

II.—The liquor of boiled raisins may be poured into the beer, with the result that the sour taste of the beer is disguised.

III.—A small quantity of a solution of potash will remove the sour taste of beer. Too much potash must not be added; otherwise the stomach will suffer. Beer thus restored will not keep long.

IV.—If the beer is not completely spoiled it may be restored by the addition of coarsely powdered charcoal.

V.—If the addition of any of the above-mentioned substances should affect the taste of the beer, a little powdered zingiber may be used to advantage. Syrup or molasses may also be employed.

Source: Henley’s Twentieth Century Formulas, Recipes and Processes

Pearl Tooth Powder

December 5th, 2017

Prepared chalk half a pound, powdered myrrh two ounces; camphor two drachms, orris root, powdered, two ounces; moisten the camphor with alcohol and mix well together.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Powder for the Skin

November 11th, 2017

If young ladies will use powder, the most harmless is refined chalk, powder is often a protection and comfort on long journeys, or in the city dust. If the pores of the skin must be filled one would prefer clean dust to begin with. A layer of powder will prevent freckles and sun-burn when properly applied. In all these cases it is worth while to know how to use it well. The skin should be as clean and cool as possible to begin. A pellet of chalk, without any poisonous bismuth in it, should be wrapped in coarse linen, and crushed in water, grinding it well between the fingers. Then wash the face quickly with the linen, and the wet powder oozes in its finest state through the cloth, leaving a pure white deposit when dry. Press the face lightly with a damp handkerchief to remove superfluous powder, wiping the brows and nostrils free. This mode of using chalk is less easily detected than when it is dusted on dry.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Tooth Powder

August 15th, 2017

Precipitated chalk, seven ounces; Florentine orris, four ounces; bicarbonate of soda, three ounces; powdered white Castile soap, two ounces; thirty drops each of oil of wintergreen and sassafras. Sift all together and keep in a glass jar or tin box. A very valuable recipe for hardening the teeth.

Source: The Golden Age Cook Book, H. L. Dwight

To Remove Grease Spots

December 28th, 2016

Take the yolk of an egg, entirely free from the white, and with a soft brush apply it on the spot until the grease appears removed or dissolved. Wash off the egg with moderately warm water, and then rinse off the whole with clean cold water.

Another. Lay a quantity of Magnesia or French chalk on the grease spot, and apply to it a hot flatiron: repeat till it is all out.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Tooth Powder

September 27th, 2015

Take pulverized chalk, and twice as much charcoal; make very fine, and add castile soap suds and spirits of camphor to make a thick paste. Apply with the finger and brush.

Source: The Kansas Home Cook-Book

Aromatic Vinegar

September 15th, 2015

Mix with a table-spoonful of vinegar enough powdered chalk to destroy the acidity. Let it settle–then turn off the vinegar from the chalk carefully, and dry it perfectly. Whenever you wish to purify an infected room, put in a few drops of sulphuric acid–the fumes arising from it will purify a room where there has been any infectious disorder. Care is necessary in using it, not to inhale the fumes, or to get any of the acid on your garments, as it will corrode whatever it touches.

Source: The American Housewife

Camphorated Chalk

April 14th, 2015

This favorite tooth powder is easily made. Take a pound of prepared chalk, and with this mix two drams of camphor very finely powdered, and moisten with spirits of wine. Thoroughly mix.

Source: The Ladies’ Book of Useful Information