To Kill A Canker

August 17th, 2018

Take 2 spoonfulls of honey and one spoonfull of treacle and half as much rock allum as the quantity of a wallnut beat to fine powder and boyle these together over a cheafen dish of coles till it be pretty thick then take it off and let it coole then anoint the cankers with a cloth tyed upon a stick the oftner you anoint it the better twill be you must keep stiring it as long as it doth boyle, it will be like a sirrup when tis cold.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

For the Worms

January 30th, 2018

Take an orange cut off the top press out the juice as near as you can then put into it half a spoonfull of oyle of bays of the juice of rue and wormwood of each half a spoonfull powder of 4 or 5 lupins dry’d with as much treacle as will fill an ordinary thimble then stop the hole with the piece you cut off tye it up close and fast that nothing get out or in, then Seeth it well and when it is cold anoynt the navell, nostrells, pulses and temples of the party therewith troubled with the Stuff it paseth all other medecins for ye worms what ever.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

How to make Treacle Posset

March 26th, 2017

Sweeten a pint of milk with four table-spoonfuls of treacle, boil this for ten minutes; strain it through a rag; drink it while hot, and go to bed well covered with blankets; and your cold will be all the less and you the better for it.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Burns

February 28th, 2016

Make a thick paste of molasses and flour, or castile soap and flour, covering the parts so as to entirely exclude the air. For a deep burn, dress daily with lime water and linseed oil, equal parts.

Source: The Kansas Home Cook-Book

Molasses Posset

January 17th, 2016

This old-fashioned remedy for a cold is as effectual now as it was in old times. Put into a saucepan a pint of the best West India molasses, a teaspoonful of powdered white ginger and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Set it over the fire and simmer it slowly for half an hour, stirring it frequently. Do not let it come to a boil. Then stir in the juice of two lemons, or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; cover the pan and let it stand by the fire five minutes longer. This is good for a cold. Some of it may be taken warm at once, and the remainder kept at hand for occasional use.

It is the preparation absurdly called by the common people stewed quaker.

Half a pint of strained honey mixed cold with the juice of a lemon and a tablespoonful of sweet oil, is another remedy for a cold; a teaspoonful or two to be taken whenever the cough is troublesome.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

The Plague-Water which was most esteemed of in the late great Visitation

April 19th, 2015

Take three Pints of Muskadine, boil therein one handful of Sage, and one handful of Rue until a Pint be wasted, then strain it out, and set it over the Fire again.

Put thereto a Penniworth of Long Pepper, half an Ounce of Ginger, and a quarter of an Ounce of Nutmegs, all beaten together, boil them together a little while close covered, then put to it one penniworth of Mithridate, two penniworth of Venice Treacle, one quarter of a Pint of hot Angelica Water.

Take one Spoonful at a time, morning and evening always warm, if you be already diseased; if not, once a day is sufficient all the Plague time.

It is most excellent Medicine, and never faileth, if taken before the heart be utterly mortified with the Disease, it is also good for the Small Pox, Measles, or Surfets.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

Dr Butler’s Cordial water

May 11th, 2008

Take Pimpernel, Carduus, Angelica, Scordium, Scabious, Dragon, and still these severally in a Rose-still; and when you have a pint of the water of every of these sorts of Herbs, then mingle all thse together very well, and dissolve in it half a pound of Venice Treacle, then still all these together, and mingle the stronger water with the small; six spoonfuls of this water, made blood warm, given to one sick of the Plague, driveth all venome from the heart. It is excellent so used, for the Small Pox, or for any pestilent Feaver.

Source: The Queens Cabinet Opened: Or, The Pearle of Practice. Accurate, Physical and Chirurgical Receipts, Nathaniel Brooke

Indigestion or Dyspepsia, Mustard and Molasses for

March 18th, 2008

“Mustard is an excellent household remedy kept in every home. A tablespoonful of white mustard mingled with two ounces of molasses and then taken once a day will act gently on the bowels and is a beneficial remedy in dyspepsia.” By acting upon the bowels it relieves the stomach of any food that may have caused a disturbance and relieves the dyspepsia.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Treacle Posset (II)

March 12th, 2008

For each person use: 1 teaspoon black treacle, 1 glass milk.

Heat the milk and dissolve the treacle in it; serve hot. Black treacle contains large amounts of the B group of vitamins and the drink is an excellent preventive measure against colds, especially if taken each evening during the winter before retiring to bed.

Source: Home Made Wines, Syrups and Cordials, The National Federation of Women’s Institutes

Treacle Posset (I)

March 8th, 2008

2 tablespoons treacle
1 lemon
1 pint milk

Heat the milk until near boiling point, then add the treacle and lemon juice. Boil slowly until the curds separate, strain and serve hot as a remedy for a cold.

Source: Home Made Wines, Syrups and Cordials, The National Federation of Women’s Institutes