Cough Syrup

May 25th, 2017

Syrup of squills four ounces, syrup of tolu four ounces, tincture of bloodroot one and one-half ounces, camphorated tincture of opium four ounces. Mix. Dose for an adult, one teaspoonful repeated every two to four hours, or as often as necessary.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

How to make a Soothing Drink for Coughs

May 5th, 2017

Take of marsh-mallow roots and of liquorice roots each one ounce; of linseed, half an ounce; shave the roots very thinly; put them and the linseed into a clean earthen pot with one quart of hot water, cover with the lid, and set the whole on the hob of the fire to simmer for half an hour or more; then strain the drink into a clean jug, sweeten with honey, and when it has become quite cold, let it be given in small quantities several times in the course of the day. This mucilaginous beverage is most beneficial in relieving persons who are suffering from cold on the chest, and also those who are afflicted with gravel, etc.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Grandmother’s Cough Syrup

April 17th, 2017

Take half a pound of dry hoarhound herbs, one pod of red pepper, four tablespoonfuls of ginger, boil all in three quarts of water, then strain, and add one teaspoonful of good, fresh tar and a pound of sugar. Boil slowly and stir often, until it is reduced to one quart of syrup. When cool, bottle for use. Take one or two teaspoonfuls four or six times a day.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

How to make a Cordial for Colds

March 10th, 2017

First, prepare a quart of the juice of black currants, by bruising and boiling them for twenty minutes, and then straining off the juice with great pressure through a sieve into a basin. Next, boil four ounces of linseed in a quart of water until reduced to one-third of its original quantity, taking care that it does not boil fast, and, when done, strain the liquid into a very clean saucepan; add the currant juice, two pounds of moist sugar, and half an ounce of citric acid, or one pint of lemon juice; boil all together until reduced to a thick syrup—that is, when it begins to run rather thick from the spoon without resembling treacle; as soon as the syrup has reached this stage, remove it from the fire, and pour it into a jug to become quite cold. This syrup will keep good for any length of time, if bottled and corked down tight, and kept in a cool place. A tea-spoonful taken occasionally will soon relieve the most troublesome cough.

This cordial may also be prepared in winter, using for the purpose black currant jam, or preserved black currant juice, instead of the juice of fresh-gathered currants.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Specific for a Cough

January 25th, 2017

Take equal quantities of camomile flowers, elecampane, life-everlasting, mullen, a few races of ginger, and as much fat lightwood splinters as camomile. Boil to a strong tea; strain it, and add enough honey and sugar mixed in equal quantities; boil down to a syrup; add enough good apple vinegar to give a pleasant acid taste. Pills made of fresh tar, brown sugar, and the yolk of an egg,
are good for a cough. Pills of fresh rosin taken from the pine tree are also good.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

For Coughs and Colds

January 15th, 2017

Equal parts of syrup of squills, Bateman’s drops, and sweet spirits of nitre; make a tea of flaxseed; flavor it by boiling sufficient lemon in it; sweeten with loaf sugar if liked. Into a wineglass of this, put a tablespoonful of the mixture; take it upon going to bed. Paregoric may be used in the place of Bateman’s drops. Give it at intervals of two or three hours until the cough is relieved.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Cough Syrup

December 6th, 2016

One cup of hops, one cup of wild cherry bark, one cup of hoarhound, one and a half gills of tar, one gill of brandy and a half pound of loaf sugar. Soak the cherry bark in one pint of water twenty-eight hours; put the hops and hoarhound in two quarts of water and keep at a temperature below (but near) boiling for two hours; boil tar with one pint of water one hour; strain the hops and hoarhound; pour off the tar into the same vessel; add sugar and one pint of water; boil until you have> a rich syrup; then add the cherry and brandy, and make up for the water that has been lost. Caution.—Do not boil the cherry.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Cough Remedy

November 26th, 2016

Four drams of syrup of squills, one ounce of wild cherry, two ounces of paregoric and five ounces of wine of tar. Take one teaspoonful three times a day. Shake well before using.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Balsam for Coughs and Colds

September 15th, 2016

Tincture of tolu and compound tincture of benzoin, of each one ounce, rectified spirit, two ounces; mix. The dose is a teaspoonful.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

For Worms for Little Children

August 30th, 2016

Stew pumpkin seeds, make a strong liquid, and give a tablespoonful once a day. Paroxysms of coughing may be prevented or cured by swallowing a little dry salt.

Source: 76: A Cook Book