Relief from Asthma

January 31st, 2016

Sufferers from asthma should get a muskrat skin and wear it over their lungs with the fur side next to the body. It will bring certain relief.

Or soak blotting paper in saltpetre water, then dry, burning at night in the patient’s bedroom.

Another excellent recipe: Take powdered liquorice root, powdered elecampane root, powdered anise-seed, each one drachm, powdered ipecac ten grains, powdered lobelia ten grains; add sufficient amount of tar to form into pills of ordinary size. Take three or four pills on going to bed. An excellent remedy for asthma or shortness of breath.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

How to Take Castor Oil

January 29th, 2016

Take a half-glass of frothy, sparkling beer, mix the dose of oil with it, and whip it up so as to make it froth strongly. The oil thus becomes intimately mixed with the froth, and if only the latter is drunk, neither the taste of the oil nor that of the beer is perceived.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Remedy for Diptheria

January 27th, 2016

Chlorate of potassa is a well known means of arresting the progress of diphtheria. A solution should be kept in every family medicine chest, ready to be administered in every suspicious case of
sore throat. The solution is made by dissolving half an ounce of the chlorate in a pint of boiling water. It should be preserved in a bottle, closely corked, and when used the bottle should be shaken with sufficient violence to diffuse the crystalline sediments through the water. The dose is a tablespoonful thrice daily.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

For the Griping in the Guts

January 25th, 2016

Take a peniworth of Brandy, and a peniworth of Mithridate mixed together, and drink it three nights together when you go to rest, or take a little Oil of Aniseeds in a Glass of Sack three times.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

A Splendid Remedy for Dysentery

January 23rd, 2016

A dessert spoonful of olive oil every four hours, and an opium pill between, this is the quantity for an adult, of course it must be much less for a child.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

A Recipe for the Removal of Pimples or Blotches

January 21st, 2016

Fifty grains of distilled water of cherry laurel, seventy-five grains of extract of lead, seven of tincture of benzoin, and thirty of alcohol; shake the benzoin and alcohol together, and then the whole very thoroughly.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

For Chapped Skin

January 19th, 2016

Keep a muslin bag filled with bran constantly soaking in the water which you use for your ablutions; the bran should be changed twice a week; immediately after bathing rub the chapped skin with deer suet, or with glycerine and rose-water, in the proportion of three parts of glycerine to one of rose-water ; do this while the skin is still wet.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Molasses Posset

January 17th, 2016

This old-fashioned remedy for a cold is as effectual now as it was in old times. Put into a saucepan a pint of the best West India molasses, a teaspoonful of powdered white ginger and a quarter of a pound of fresh butter. Set it over the fire and simmer it slowly for half an hour, stirring it frequently. Do not let it come to a boil. Then stir in the juice of two lemons, or two tablespoonfuls of vinegar; cover the pan and let it stand by the fire five minutes longer. This is good for a cold. Some of it may be taken warm at once, and the remainder kept at hand for occasional use.

It is the preparation absurdly called by the common people stewed quaker.

Half a pint of strained honey mixed cold with the juice of a lemon and a tablespoonful of sweet oil, is another remedy for a cold; a teaspoonful or two to be taken whenever the cough is troublesome.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Wash to Perfume the Breath

January 15th, 2016

Cloves, bruised in a mortar, three teaspoonfuls; boiling water, one pint. Infuse for an hour in a covered vessel — exactly as in making tea — when cold, decant, or filter through coarse muslin. Wash the mouth with it as often as may seem necessary.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Hair Stimulant

January 13th, 2016

One ounce of spirits of turpentine; one ounce of trotter oil; thirty drops of acetic solution of
cantharides.

To be applied three times a week.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington