Borage

September 20th, 2021

This plant contains a certain amount of saltpetre, as may be proved by burning a dried leaf. For this reason, it is used with great benefit for the relief of sore throats. The root is rich in gum, and if boiled yields a mucilaginous emulsion, excellent for irritation of the throat and chest. Very violent attacks of toothache, where the nerve has taken cold, are often cured by holding a portion of the leaves, previously boiled in milk, and applied warm, in the mouth, against the affected tooth.

Source: The Universal Cookery Book, Gertrude Strohm

Gargle for Sore Throat

September 2nd, 2021

Make a gargle of one teaspoonful of molasses, one of salt, and one half-teaspoonful of cayenne-pepper. Mix these with one teacupful of hot water. When cool, add one quarter of a cup of cider-vinegar.

Source: The Universal Cookery Book, Gertrude Strohm

White Liniment

August 29th, 2021

Good for sprains, bruises, sores, sore throat, etc. Take one quart of sharp apple vinegar, one-half pint of turpentine, and three eggs, and shake well together. This is equally good for man or beast.

Source: The Inglenook Cook Book

Gargles For Inflamed Throat

August 19th, 2021

Take one dram of sulphuric ether and add to it half an ounce of syrup of marsh-mallows and a teacupful of barley water. Gargle the throat frequently with the mixture until the inflammation dies away.

Or, mix together two drams of purified nitre, seven drams of acetate of honey, and eight ounces of barley-water. Use frequently.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Sore Throat

May 19th, 2021

Slice a thin piece of old smoked bacon, the older the better. Stitch this to a piece of flannel and make it black with pepper. Warm it and fasten closely around the throat. Do not remove until the inflammation has been drawn to the outside. When the meat is taken off anoint the throat with a good vaseline and bind up in flannel which must be left on until the throat is entirely well.

Source: The Inglenook Cook Book

Elliman’s Embrocation

May 15th, 2021

One new-laid egg well beaten, add to it by degrees one gill turpentine, one gill vinegar, put in alternately one-half ounce spirits of camphor.

Directions for use. — For rheumatism, lumbago, for sore throat, cold in chest, etc., rub in well with hand, night and morning. A flannel may also be soaked in embrocation and put on, covered with a cloth or flannel. Can be used also as a substitute for mustard plaster, as above.

Source: The Canadian Family Cookbook, Grace E. Denison

To Remove Sudden Hoarseness

March 7th, 2021

Take a teaspoonful of sweet spirits of nitre in a wineglassful of water. Or a little salt prunella dissolved slowly in the mouth, or eating a piece of anchovy will generally remove it.

The following will likewise be found very useful: — Spermaceti powder, half an ounce ; gum-arabic powder, half an ounce ; elixir paregoric, three drams ; honey, one tablespoonful. Mix, and take a teaspoonful dissolved in the mouth.

Source: Recipes for the Million

An excellent Gargle for a Sore Throat

March 5th, 2021

Half fill a teapot with dark red rose leaves, pour boiling water over; when cold strain it into a 6 oz. bottle, add a tea-spoonful of tincture of myrrh, and 25 drops of elixir of vitriol: if the throat be ulcerated, a tea-spoonful of tincture of cayenne.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

For a Sore Throat

April 8th, 2020

At the beginning of a sore throat, get fresh ivy leaves, tack them together, warm them, and put the shady side to the throat.– Or: wet bread-crumbs with brandy, and tie them round the throat. Make a gargle of 2 carrots, sliced and boiled, and use it often.– Or: dissolve 4 oz. camphor in a pint of rectified spirits of wine. Dip a piece of new Welsh flannel into this, and apply it to the throat. Be careful to wet frequently.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Cough Mixture

March 29th, 2020

1/2 lb. treacle
1d. paregoric
1d. peppermint
1/2 pint boiling water
1d. aniseed
1d. laudanum

Put in a pint bottle and mix well together. Dose, wine-glassful.

Source: The Northampton Cookery Book, M.A. Jeffery