Virtues of Turpentine

February 11th, 2018

After a housekeeper fully realizes the worth of turpentine in the household, she is never willing to be without a supply of it.

1 — It gives quick relief to burns.

2 — It is an excellent application for corns.

3 — It is good for rheumatism and for sore-throats.

4 — It is the quickest remedy for convulsions or fits by applying to the back of the neck.

5 — It is a sure preventive against moths; by just dropping a trifle in the bottom of drawers, chests and wardrobes, it will render the garments secure from injury during the summer.

6 — It will keep ants and bugs from closets and storerooms by putting a few drops in the corners and shelves. It is sure destruction to bed-bugs and will effectually drive them away from their haunts, if thoroughly applied to all the joints of the bedstead in the spring cleaning time, and injures neither furniture nor clothing.

7 — A little in suds washing day lightens laundry labor.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

Sore Throat

February 9th, 2018

At night wrap a cloth wet in alcohol around outside of throat. Gargle with salt and water (1 tsp. to a glass), or borax and water in same proportion, or hot tea, or with the following—

Gargle:

2 tbsp. vinegar,
1 tbsp. salt,
Water to fill a tumbler.

If persistent, see doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Camphorated Oil

June 12th, 2017

Best oil of Lucca, gum camphor. Pound some gum camphor and fill a wide-necked pint bottle one-third full; fill up with olive oil and set away until the camphor is absorbed. Excellent lotion for sore chest, sore throat, aching limbs, etc.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Refreshing Drink for Sore Throat attended with Fever

May 21st, 2017

Boil two ounces of barberries with half an ounce of violets in a quart of water for ten minutes; sweeten with honey, strain off into a jug, and drink several glasses during the day.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

How to make a Stringent Gargle

May 17th, 2017

Put the following ingredients into a very clean earthen pipkin:— Twenty sage leaves, a handful of red rose leaves, and a pint of water; boil these for twenty minutes, then add a gill of vinegar, and two table-spoonfuls of honey; boil again for ten minutes, and strain the gargle through a muslin rag, to be used when cold.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Inflamed Sore Throat

February 16th, 2017

Gargle with borax and alum, dissolved in water. Take equal parts of saltpetre and loaf sugar pulverized together; place upon the tongue, and let it trickle down slowly to the inflamed part. Use this two or three times a day. Rub the glands with a mixture of camphor, cantharides, myrrh, and turpentine. If this fails to reduce the inflammation, put a small blister within an inch of the ears. A gargle with red pepper tea is good. Give cooling medicines. Bathe the feet at night. Avoid taking cold.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Putrid Sore Throat

January 21st, 2017

Mix one gill of strong apple vinegar, cue tablespoonful of common salt, tablespoonful of strained honey, half a pod of red pepper; boil them together; strain into half a pint of strong sage tea. In severe cases give half a teaspoonful for an adult every hour; decrease the dose as the disease is relieved. Use some as a gargle.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Pepper Tea

November 14th, 2016

Six red peppers broken in small pieces, one pint of boiling water poured over them, one teaspoonful of salt, one-half pint of vinegar. This is a good remedy for sore throat.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Flaxseed for Sore Throat

September 5th, 2016

For a sore throat and congested lungs take a glass of hot flaxseed, add the juice of two lemons, sweeten to taste, and let boil in a double boiler for one hour, then strain.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

For Hoarseness

July 29th, 2016

Beat the whites of two eggs with two spoons of white sugar, a little nutmeg and a cup of warm water; mix well and drink often.

Source: 76: A Cook Book