Chills and Fever, Peruvian Bark and Rhubarb for

January 31st, 2008

“Pure Rye Whisky 4 ounces
Pulverized Peruvian Bark 1 dram
Pulverized Rhubarb 1 ounce

Mix.

Put in bottles. Dose for adults:– One tablespoonful three times a day. This is an excellent remedy.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Severe Cold or Threatened Consumption

January 31st, 2008

“One pint of molasses; one pint of vinegar; three tablespoonfuls of white pine tar; let this boil not quite half down; remove from the stove and let stand until next day; then take and skim tar off from the top, throwing tar away. Jar up and take as often as necessary. Spoonful every half to two hours.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Erysipelas, Easy Remedy for

January 31st, 2008

“Keep parts well bathed with witch-hazel.” A good preparation should be bought. By applying this freely to the affected parts it will be found to have a very soothing effect.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

News: Crazy or Brilliant? Home Remedies for Pain

January 30th, 2008

“Right now — in bathrooms, bedrooms or at the kitchen sink — people across the world are trying rather unusual home remedies to cure their pain.

In Mexico, some people rub potato halves on their foreheads for headaches. In Central America, blowing cigar smoke on a sufferer’s back is believed to bring them pain relief. And in the United States, rubbing cobwebs into cuts is believed to stop bleeding and pain.”

Full story: ABC News, 29th January 2008

After Receiving A Bruise On The Finger Nail

January 30th, 2008

plunge the finger into water as hot as can be borne. By doing so the nail is softened, and yields so as to accommodate itself to the blood poured out beneath it, and the pain is soon diminished. The finger may then be wrapped in a bread-and-water poultice. On the following, or on the third day, the blood has clotted; and separating into its clot and fluid parts, the pressure it makes on the sensitive skin under the nail may be relieved by scraping the nail with a penknife till it becomes so thin that the scraping causes pain. The thin nail left is very light, and the pressure is mitigated; but if the squeezed part of the nail be very black, and tender when touched, it is best, after scraping, to make a nick through the remaining nail over the black blood, and immediately the watery part gushes out, the pressure almost entirely ceases, and instantaneous relief is afforded, but it unfortunately rarely, if ever, prevents the nail from coming off.

Source: Home Notes, January 1895.

Colds, to Break Up at the Outset

January 30th, 2008

“To break up a cold soak the feet in hot water and drink all the cold water you can.” This has been known to cure many severe colds if taken at the beginning.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

To make a very good Pomatum

January 30th, 2008

[Editor’s note: this one’s a bit more unpleasant than most]

Take the Fat of a young Dog one pound. It must be killed well that the blood setle not into the fat, then let the outer skin be taken off before it be opened, lest any of the hair come to the fat, then take all the fat from the inside and as soon as you take it off fling it into Conduit-water; and if you see the second skin be clear, peel it and water it with the other: be sure it cools not out of the water: you must not let any of the flesh remain on it, for then the Pomatum will not keep. To one pound of this fat take two pound of Lambs caule, and put it to the other in the water and when you see it is cold, drain it from the water in a Napkin, and break it in little peices with your fingers, and take out all the little veins; then take eight ounces of Oyl of Tartar, and put in that first, stiring it well together, then put it into a Gallon of Conduit water, and let it stand till night; shift this with so much Oyl and Water, morning and evening seven dayes together, and be sure you shift it constantly; and the day before you mean to melt it wring it hard by a little at a time, and be sure the Oyl and water be all out of it, wring the water well out of it with a Napkin every time you shift it; then put in three pints of Rose-water; let it stand close covered twelve hours, then wring out that, and put it in a pint of fresh Rose-water into a high Gallipot with the Faeces; then tie it close up, and set it in a pot of water, and let it boil two hours then take it out, and strain it into an earthen Pan, let it stand till it be cold; then cut a hole in it, and let out the water, then scrape away the bottom, and dry it with a cloth, and dry the pan; melt it in a Chafing-dish of Coales, or in the Gallipots; beat it so long till it look very white and shining; then with your hand fling it in fine Cakes upon white paper, and let it lye till it be cold, then put it into Gallipots. This will be very good for two or three years.

Pin worms, Aloes treatment for

January 29th, 2008

“Pin worms or seat worms are usually found in children and sometime cause a great deal of annoyance to the child. They are usually very restless at night and pull at the rectum both day and night. This condition may be relieved by an injection, of powdered aloes,– five grains; hot water one-half pint.” This is sufficient for two injections and should be used at about blood heat.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

The Bite Of A Wood-Hound

January 29th, 2008

The biting of a wood hound is deadly and venomous. And such venom is perilous. For it is long hidden and unknown, and increaseth and multiplieth itself, and is sometimes unknown to the year’s end, and then the same day and hour of the biting, it cometh to the head, and breedeth frenzy. They that are bitten of a wood hound have in their sleep dreadful sights, and are fearful, astonied, and wroth without cause. And they dread to be seen of other men, and bark as hounds, and they dread water most of all things, and are afeared thereof full sore, and squeamous also. Against the biting of a wood hound wise men and ready used to make the wounds bleed with fire or with iron, that the venom may come out with blood, that cometh out of the wound.

Source: Mediaeval Lore from Bartholomew Anglicus, Robert Steele

Ingredients: Angelica

January 29th, 2008

Also called Master-Wort.

The wild Angelica grows commonly throughout England in wet places as an umbelliferous plant, with a tall hollow stem, out of which boys like to make pipes. It is purple, furrowed, and downy, bearing white flowers tinged with pink. But the herb is not useful as a simple until cultivated in our gardens, the larger variety being chosen for this purpose, and bearing the name Archangelica.

“Angelica, the happy counterbane,
Sent down from heaven by some celestial scout,
As well its name and nature both avow’t.”

It came to this country from northern latitudes in 1568. The aromatic stems are grown abundantly near London in moist fields for the use of confectioners. These stems, when candied, are sold as a favourite sweetmeat. They are grateful to the feeble stomach, and will relieve flatulence promptly. The roots of the garden Angelica contain plentifully a peculiar resin called “angelicin,” which is stimulating to the lungs, and to the skin: they smell pleasantly of musk, being an excellent tonic and carminative. An infusion of the plant may be made by pouring a pint of boiling water on an ounce of the bruised root, and two tablespoonfuls of this should be given three or four times in the day; or the powdered root may be administered in doses of from ten to thirty grains. The infusion will relieve flatulent stomach-ache, and will promote menstruation if retarded. It is also of use as a stimulating bronchial tonic in the catarrh of aged and feeble persons. Angelica, taken in either medicinal form, is said to cause a disgust for spirituous liquors. In high Dutch it is named the root of the Holy Ghost. The fruit is employed for flavouring some cordials, notably Chartreuse. If an incision is made in the bark of the stems, and the crown of the root, at the commencement of spring, a resinous gum exudes with a special aromatic flavour as of musk or benzoin, for either of which it can be substituted. Gerard says: “If you do but take a piece of the root, and hold it in your mouth, or chew the same between your teeth, it doth most certainly drive away pestilent aire.” Icelanders eat both the stem and the roots raw with butter. These parts of the plant, if wounded, yield a yellow juice which becomes, when dried, a valuable medicine beneficial in chronic rheumatism and gout. Some have said the Archangelica was revealed in a dream by an angel to cure the plague; others aver that it blooms on the day of Michael the Archangel (May 8th, old style), and is therefore a preservative against evil spirits and witchcraft.

Source: Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure, William Thomas Fernie