Another Remedy for Scarlet Fever

January 18th, 2018

Undress the child and put it to bed at the very first sign of sickness. Give it, if it has already fever, sourish warm lemonade, with some gum arabic in it. Then cover the abdomen with some dry flannel. Take a well-folded bed-sheet and put it in boiling hot water ; wring it out by means of dry towels, and put this over the whole and wait. The hot cloth will perhaps require repeated heating, according to the severity of the case and its stage of progress. Perspiration will commence in the child in from ten minutes to two hours. The child then is saved ; it soon falls to sleep. Soon after the child awakes it shows slight symptoms of returning inclination for food ; if necessary give injections of oil, or soap and water, and its recovery will be as steady as the growth of a green-house plant if well treated. If the above treatment is applied in due time under the eyes and direction of a competent physician, it is said that not one in a hundred children will ever die of scarlet fever.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Fever Blisters (Cold Sores)

November 19th, 2017

Apply boric acid ointment, or touch frequently with spirit of nitre or spirit of camphor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Cure for Chills and Fever

October 2nd, 2017

Quinine is the only remedy, and taken in the following manner, will cure successfully : Have twenty grains of quinine put up in five grains powders ; after you have had the chill, and the fever has passed off, take one powder (five grains), then in four or five hours take the same quantity again, and so on until you have taken the twenty grains. You will then escape your chill the third day. Before the seventh day comes around (they come on periodically every seventh day) take the same quantity as before just as if you had had a chill. Keep this treatment up for six or eight weeks, and you will be entirely restored. I think will never have a return of ague.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Refreshing Drink for Sore Throat attended with Fever

May 21st, 2017

Boil two ounces of barberries with half an ounce of violets in a quart of water for ten minutes; sweeten with honey, strain off into a jug, and drink several glasses during the day.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Mint, Balm and Other Teas

November 24th, 2016

Put either the fresh or the dried plants into boiling water in a covered vessel, which should be placed near the fire for an hour. The young shoots both of balm and of mint are to be preferred, on account of their strong aromatic qualities. These infusions may be drunk freely in feverish and in various other complaints, in which diluents are recommended. Mint tea, made with the fresh leaves, is useful in allaying nausea and vomiting.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Grandmother’s Eye-Wash

October 19th, 2016

Take three fresh eggs and break them into one quart of clear, cold rain-water; stir until thoroughly mixed; bring to a boil on a slow fire, stirring often; then add half an ounce of sulphate of zinc (white vitrol); continue the boiling for two minutes, then set it off the fire. Take the curd that settles at the bottom of this and apply to the eye at night with a bandage. It will speedily draw out all fever and soreness. Strain the liquid through a cloth and use for bathing the eyes occasionally. This is the best eye-water ever made for man or beast. I have used it for twenty years without knowing it to fail.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Cracker Panada

June 21st, 2016

Break in pieces three or four hard crackers that are baked quite brown, and let them boil fifteen minutes in one quart of water; then remove from the fire, let them stand three or four minutes, strain off the liquor through a fine wire sieve, and season it with sugar.

This is a nourishing beverage for infants that are teething, and with the addition of a little wine and nutmeg, is often prescribed for invalids recovering from a fever.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Mulled Wine

May 16th, 2016

Take a quarter of an ounce of bruised cinnamon, half a nutmeg, (grated), and ten bruised cloves ; infuse them in half a pint of boiling water for an hour, strain, and add half an ounce of white sugar. Pour the whole into a pint of hot port or sherry wine. This is a good cordial and restorative in the low stages of fever, or in the debility of convalescence from fevers.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Toast Water

February 8th, 2016

Toast thoroughly a slice of stale bread, put it in a jug, and pour over it a quart of water which has been boiled and cooled, and in two hours decant ; a small piece of orange or lemon peel put into the jug with the bread improves the flavor greatly. This forms a good drink in febrile afflictions.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Arrowroot Wine Jelly

November 12th, 2015

One cupful of boiling water, one scant tablespoonful of arrowroot, mixed with a little cold water, one tablespoonful of sugar, a pinch of salt, one tablespoonful of brandy, or three tablespoonfuls of wine. Excellent for a sick person without fever.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette