Biliousness

November 13th, 2017

Give citrate of magnesia, or Epsom or Rochelle salt, or castor oil. Cracked ice slowly melted in the mouth generally relieves sick stomach.

Hot, clear coffee given after any of the above medicines counteracts greatly the nauseating effect.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

“Gum Boils” or “Canker Sores”

October 24th, 2017

So-called “gum boils” or “canker sores” are little ulcer-like sores which at times appear in children’s mouths, caused by disarrangement of the stomach. Local applications, such as borax or powdered alum, shrink the sores and give a little relief; but the child should be given a dose of calcined magnesia at night or citrate of magnesia in the morning. (Never give a small dose of citrate of magnesia; a child of twelve years should take a tumblerful.)

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

To Remove Grease Spots

December 28th, 2016

Take the yolk of an egg, entirely free from the white, and with a soft brush apply it on the spot until the grease appears removed or dissolved. Wash off the egg with moderately warm water, and then rinse off the whole with clean cold water.

Another. Lay a quantity of Magnesia or French chalk on the grease spot, and apply to it a hot flatiron: repeat till it is all out.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Rose-Water

November 22nd, 2016

Preferable to the distilled for a perfume, or for culinary purposes. Attar of rose, twelve drops; rub it up with half an ounce of white sugar and two drachms carbonate magnesia; then add gradually one quart of water and two ounces of proof spirit, and filter through paper.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

English Cure for Drunken[n]ess

May 22nd, 2016

This recipe comes into notoriety through the efforts of John Vine Hall, who had fallen into such habitual drunkeness that his most earnest efforts to reclaim himself proved unavailing. He sought the advice of an eminent physician who gave him a prescription which he followed for several months, and at the end of that time had lost all desire for liquor.

The recipe is as follows: Five grains of sulphate of iron, ten grains of magnesia, eleven drachms of peppermint water and one drachm of spirits of nutmeg; to be taken twice a day. This preparation acts as a stimulant and tonic and partially supplies the place of the accustomed liquor, and prevents that absolute physical and moral prostration that follows a sudden breaking off from the use of stimulating drinks.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Powders for Children

August 20th, 2015

A very excellent carminative powder for flatulent infants may be kept in the house, and employed with advantage whenever the child is in pain or griped, dropping five grains of oil of anise-seed and two of peppermint on half an ounce of lump sugar, and rubbing it in a mortar, with a drachm of magnesia, into a fine powder. A small quantity of this may be given in a little water at any time, and always with benefit.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Rye Tooth Powder

April 28th, 2015

Rye contains carbonate of lime, carbonate of magnesia, oxide of iron, manganese, and silica, all suitable for application to the teeth. Therefore, a fine tooth powder is made by burning rye, or rye bread, to ashes, and grinding it to powder by passing the rolling-pin over it. Pass the powder through a sieve, and use.

Source: The Ladies’ Book of Useful Information

Chafing, Borax and Zinc Stops

December 25th, 2008

“Wash parts frequently with cold water and use the following solution:

Pure Water 2 gills
Powdered Borax 1 teaspoonful
Sulphate of Zinc 1/2 teaspoonful

Apply by means of a soft rag several times daily. After drying the parts well, dust with wheat flour, corn starch or powdered magnesia.”

The above combination is excellent as the water cleanses the parts and the borax and zinc are very soothing and healing.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter