A Hair Tonic

October 18th, 2019

Scald two ounces of black tea in one gallon of boiling water; add three ounces of glycerine, one quart of bay rum and half an ounce of the tincture of cantharides; scald for five minutes longer; strain and bottle. This will prevent the hair from falling out, and at the same time will stimulate a new and healthy growth.

Source: The Kentucky Housewife, Mrs Peter A. White

Excellent Tonic for the Hair

March 29th, 2019

1 teaspoonful of quinine, 1 tablespoonful of salt, 1 pint of whisky.

Source: Flint Hills Cook Book

Herb Teas

March 7th, 2019

Herb teas are made by infusing the dried or green leaves and stalks in boiling water, and letting them stand until cold. Sweeten to taste.

Sage tea, sweetened with honey, is good for a sore throat, used as a gargle, with a small bit of alum dissolved in it.

Catnip tea is the best panacea for infant ills, in the way of cold and colic, known to nurses.

Pennyroyal tea will often avert the unpleasant consequences of a sudden check of perspiration, or the evils induced by ladies’ thin shoes.

Chamomile and gentian teas are excellent tonics taken either cold or hot.

The tea made from blackberry-root is said to be good for summer disorders. That from green strawberry leaves is an admirable and soothing wash for a cankered mouth.

Tea of parsley-root scraped and steeped in boiling water, taken warm, will often cure strangury and kindred affections, as will that made from dried pumpkin-seed.

Tansy and rue teas are useful in cases of colic, as are fennel seeds steeped in brandy.

A tea of damask-rose leaves, dry or fresh, will usually subdue any simple case of summer complaint in infants.

Mint tea, made from the green leaves, crushed in cold or hot water and sweetened, is palatable and healing to the stomach and bowels.

Source: Common Sense in the Household, Marion Harland

A Certain Cure for Drunkenness

November 9th, 2018

Sulphate of iron, 5 grains; magnesia, 10 grains; peppermint water, 11 drachms; spirits of nutmeg, 1 drachm; twice a day. This preparation acts as a tonic and stimulant, and so partially supplies the place of the accustomed liquor, and prevents that absolute physical and moral prostration that follows a sudden breaking off from the use of stimulating drinks.

Source: Our Knowledge Box, ed. G. Blackie

Hints to Young Ladies (I)

October 22nd, 2017

Two simple chemicals should appear on every toilet-table : the carbonate of ammonia and powdered charcoal. No cosmetic has more frequent uses than these. The ammonia must be kept in glass with a glass stopper from the air. French charcoal is preferred by physicians, as it is more finely ground, and a large bottle of it should be kept on hand. In cases of debility, and all wasting disorders it is valuable. To clear the complexion, take a teaspoonful of charcoal well mixed in water or honey for three nights, then use a simple purgative to remove it from the system. It acts like calomel with no bad effect, purifying the blood more effectually than any thing else. But do not omit the aperient, or the charcoal will remain in the system. After this course of purification, tonics may be used.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

A Splendid Hair Tonic

April 25th, 2017

A strong tincture for the hair is made by adding half an ounce of oil of mace to a pint of deodorized alcohol. Pour a spoonful or two into a saucer; dip a small stiff brush into it, and brush the hair smartly, rubbing the tincture well into the roots. On bald spots, if hair will start at all, it may be stimulated by friction with a piece of flannel until the skin looks red, and rubbing the tincture into the scalp. This process must be repeated three times a day for weeks. When the hair begins to grow, apply the tincture once a day until the growth is well established, bathing the head in cold water every morning, and briskly brushing it to bring the blood to the surface.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Tonic

November 20th, 2016

One drachm of pulverized colombo, one drachm of rasp. d. quartia, two drachms of peruvian bark, one drachm of orange peel, one drachm of ginger, two ounces of loaf sugar and a half pint of liquor. Let it stand twenty-four hours and then add a half pint of water.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

English Cure for Drunken[n]ess

May 22nd, 2016

This recipe comes into notoriety through the efforts of John Vine Hall, who had fallen into such habitual drunkeness that his most earnest efforts to reclaim himself proved unavailing. He sought the advice of an eminent physician who gave him a prescription which he followed for several months, and at the end of that time had lost all desire for liquor.

The recipe is as follows: Five grains of sulphate of iron, ten grains of magnesia, eleven drachms of peppermint water and one drachm of spirits of nutmeg; to be taken twice a day. This preparation acts as a stimulant and tonic and partially supplies the place of the accustomed liquor, and prevents that absolute physical and moral prostration that follows a sudden breaking off from the use of stimulating drinks.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Pennington’s Old Virginia Beef-Tea Tonic

October 27th, 2015

One pound of lean, juicy beef; half a pint of cold water; half a pint of old bourbon whiskey.

Cut the beef into pieces about half an inch square ; pour over it half a pint of cold water, cover, and let it stand twelve hours ; then add half a pint of old bourbon whiskey, and let it stand six hours ; then strain three or four times until quite clear ; keep (closely covered) in a cool place, and take a small wineglassful two or three times a day. This is a capital tonic.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Stomachic Tincture

August 28th, 2015

Bruise a couple of ounces of Peruvian bark, one of bitter dried orange peel. Steep them in a pint of proof spirit a fortnight, shaking up the bottle that contains it once or twice every day. Let it remain untouched for a couple of days, then decant the bitter into another bottle. A tea-spoonful of this, in a wine glass of water, is a fine tonic.

Source: The American Housewife