Beef Tea (For Invalids)

June 29th, 2016

One-half pound tender beef (no fat), cut in bits; put in glass bottles, with top well screwed on (can add a little water), place in kettle of boiling water 20 minutes, take out, shake well; this quantity makes 1 cup of rich tea.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

All-Healing Ointment

June 27th, 2016

One part white rosin, one part beeswax, one part turpentine and two parts of mutton tallow.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Cough Mixture

June 25th, 2016

Take buttonwood root and make a strong tea of it; to a pint of the tea and a pint of honey, a piece of saltpetre about the size of your thumb; mix all together and boil down to one pint; also add one tablespoon of paregoric.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

For Rheumatism

June 23rd, 2016

Take equal parts of the best oil of Juniper and spirits of turpentine, and rub the parts afflicted thoroughly. Particular care should be taken to use only the best oil and spirits.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Cracker Panada

June 21st, 2016

Break in pieces three or four hard crackers that are baked quite brown, and let them boil fifteen minutes in one quart of water; then remove from the fire, let them stand three or four minutes, strain off the liquor through a fine wire sieve, and season it with sugar.

This is a nourishing beverage for infants that are teething, and with the addition of a little wine and nutmeg, is often prescribed for invalids recovering from a fever.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Cure for Ringworm

June 19th, 2016

Yellow dock, root or leaves, steeped in vinegar, will cure the worst case of ringworm.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Some Simple Remedies From a Texas Lady

June 17th, 2016

For Indigestion: One-quarter of a teaspoon of soda, 10 drops of peppermint in 1/3 of a glass of water.

For Sick Headache: The juice of 1 lemon in a half glass of water, either hot or cold; a little sugar and 1/4 of a teaspoon of soda.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

To Cure Earache

June 15th, 2016

Take a bit of cotton batting, put on it a pinch of black pepper, gather it up and tie it, dip it in sweet oil, and insert it in the ear; put a flannel bandage over the head to keep it warm; it often gives immediate relief.

Tobacco smoke, puffed into the ear, has often been effectual.

Another remedy: Take equal parts of tincture of opium and glycerine. Mix, and from a warm teaspoon drop two or three drops into the ear, stop the ear tight with cotton, and repeat every hour or two. If matter should form in the ear, make a suds with castile soap and warm water, about 100° F., or a little more than milk warm, and have some person inject it into the ear while you hold that side of your head the lowest. If it does not heal in due time, inject a little carbolic acid and water in the proportion of one drachm of the acid to one pint of warm water each time after using the suds.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Preventive of Seasickness

June 13th, 2016

The following remedy, preventive of seasickness, is recommended by Prof. E. Tourgee, of Boston, manager of tourist excursions. It was tried by himself and family, five in all, who had suffered from seasickness on every former voyage across the Atlantic, and in each case it proved entirely successful, and produced no unfavorable results.

Dissolve 1 ounce of bromide of sodium in 4 ounces of water; take 1 teaspoon 3 times a day before eating. Begin taking the above 3 days before starting on the sea voyage.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

A Most Excellent Remedy for Toothache

June 11th, 2016

Alcohol one ounce, laudanum one drachm, chloroform five drachms, gum camphor one-half drachm, oil of cloves one-half drachm, sulph. ether two drachms, oil of lavender one drachm. Saturate a small piece of cotton, and put into the cavity; be careful not to touch any part of the mouth with it as it is very pungent; put the cotton on the point of some sharp instrument, put it into the cavity and place a small piece of clean cotton over it.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook