To Cure Earache

June 15th, 2016

Take a bit of cotton batting, put on it a pinch of black pepper, gather it up and tie it, dip it in sweet oil, and insert it in the ear; put a flannel bandage over the head to keep it warm; it often gives immediate relief.

Tobacco smoke, puffed into the ear, has often been effectual.

Another remedy: Take equal parts of tincture of opium and glycerine. Mix, and from a warm teaspoon drop two or three drops into the ear, stop the ear tight with cotton, and repeat every hour or two. If matter should form in the ear, make a suds with castile soap and warm water, about 100° F., or a little more than milk warm, and have some person inject it into the ear while you hold that side of your head the lowest. If it does not heal in due time, inject a little carbolic acid and water in the proportion of one drachm of the acid to one pint of warm water each time after using the suds.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Earache

December 6th, 2015

There are various ways of treating earache: the most old fashioned are the appliance of a roasted onion, or a hot bag of salt to the ear, and putting in the ear a small piece of cotton wet with camphorated oil, or simple olive-oil with a drop of chloroform; better still, to puff tobacco smoke into the ear. This remedy is very soothing and effective.

Or, take a small wax taper, pare one end quite small, envelop it in a dry linen rag, insert it into the ear; then light the taper. Odd as this remedy may seem, it is wonderfully rapid and effective; it is practised by all Italian sailors and fishermen.

In Kentucky, a cockroach is drowned in whiskey, then wrapped in hot cotton, and applied to the ear.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Preservatives against the ravages of Moths

September 19th, 2015

Moths are very apt to eat woollen and fur garments early in the summer. To keep them from the garments, take them late in the spring, when not worn, and put them in a chest, with considerable camphor gum. Cedar chips, or tobacco leaves, are also good for this purpose. When moths get into garments, the best thing to destroy them is to hang the garments in a closet, and make a strong smoke of tobacco leaves under them. In order to do it, have a pan of live coals in the closet, and sprinkle on the tobacco leaves.

Source: The American Housewife

Pile Ointment

March 28th, 2015

Take say a teacupful of hog’s lard, put in a flat or pewter dish, and take two bars of lead, flattened a little, and rub the lard with the flat ends and between them till it becomes black or of a dark lead color. Then burn equal parts of cavendish tobacco and old shoeleather in an iron vessel till charred. Powder these and mix into the lard till it becomes a thick ointment. Use once or twice a day as an ointment for the piles. An infallible cure.

Source: The Ladies’ Book of Useful Information

Scalds, Raisins and Lard with Tobacco Helps

December 5th, 2008

“One pound Raisins, chopped.
One pound Lard.
Five cent package of Chewing Tobacco.

Mix all together and let this simmer about three hours slowly, strain it
and put in a jar.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Kitridge’s Salve

November 2nd, 2008

Bitter-sweet and sweet elder roots, of each 1 1/2 lbs; hop vines and leaves, and garden plantain, top and root, of each 1/2 lb; tobacco 1 three-cent plug. Boil all in rain water to get out the strength, then put the herbs in a thick cloth and press out the juice and boil down carefully to 1/2 pt; then add unsalted butter 1 lb; bees-wax and rosin, of each 1 oz, and simmer over a slow fire until the water is all out.

Source: Dr Chase’s Recipes, or Information for Everybody, A.W. Chase

Bleeding, Tobacco Will Stop

August 12th, 2008

“Bind in tobacco.” Very few people know that the nicotine in tobacco is very healing, and by applying it to a cut, not only stops the flow of blood, but heals.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

News: ‘Spring Tonic’ Explores Remedies Of The Past

March 28th, 2008

“Learn about historical medicines and cures, including why some 18th century folks tied cowpies around their necks for sore throats, at the Schiele Museum “Spring Tonic” program from 1-5 p.m. Sunday at the museum’s 18th-Century Backcountry Farm.”

Full story: Gaston Gazette, 26th March 2008 (Gastonia, North Carolina, USA)