Slight Wounds

December 21st, 2021

When fresh wounds bleed much, lint dipped in vinegar or spirits of turpentine, may be pressed upon the surface for a few minutes, and retained by a moderately tight bandage; but if the blood spirts out violently, it shows that an artery is wounded, and it must be held very firmly till a surgeon arrives. But when the blood seems to flow equally from every part of the wound, and there is no reason therefore to suppose that any considerable vessel is wounded, it may be permitted to bleed while the dressings are preparing. The edges of the wound are then to be gently pressed together, and retained by straps of sticking plaster. These may remain on for three or four days, unless the sore becomes painful, or the matter smells offensive, in which case the straps of plaster must be taken off, the parts washed clean with warm water, and fresh slips of plaster applied, nicely adjusted to keep the wound closed. The slips must be laid over the wound crossways, and reach several inches beyond each side of it, in order to hold the parts firmly together. By keeping the limb or part very still, abstaining from strong liquors, taking only light mild food, and keeping the bowels open, all simple wounds may easily be healed in this manner. But poultices, greasy salves, or filling the wound with lint, will have an opposite effect. Even ragged or torn wounds may be drawn together and healed by sticking plaster, without any other salves or medicines. A broken shin, or slight ruffling of the skin, may be covered with lint dipped in equal parts of
vinegar and brandy, and left to stick on, unless the place inflames; and then weak goulard is the best remedy. Common cuts may be kept together by sticking plaster, or with only a piece of fine linen rag, or thread bound round them. The rag applied next to a cut or wound of any kind, should always be of white linen; but calico, or coloured rags, will do quite as well for outward bandages. Important wounds should always be committed to the care of a skilful surgeon.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Salve

November 11th, 2021

Four ounces of mutton-tallow, two of beeswax, one of rosin, and one-half ounce of gum camphor. Simmer well together; take off the fire, and then add one gill of alcohol. Good for all kinds of sores and wounds.

Source: The Universal Cookery Book, Gertrude Strohm

Burns

October 16th, 2021

Anything which excludes air without tainting the wound or irritating it further helps a bad burn. Carron oil — a creamy mixture of lime water and sweet oil — applied with a feather, then covered with cotton, either batting or absorbent, gives a measure of relief and is also healing. Soft old linen coated with fresh egg-white laid on and allowed to dry soothes pain. Even a covering with dry flour, if nothing else is handy, is better than leaving the burn bare. But if at all serious, or even is shallow and wide spread, call a doctor instantly, meantime keeping up heart action with stimulants in small doses often repeated.

Source: Harper’s Household Handbook: A guide to easy ways of doing woman’s work, Martha McCulloch-Williams

For Bruises, Cuts, or Wounds

July 8th, 2021

Keep in the house a bottle containing a mixture of 3/4 oz. of scented trefoil, of rum, and of sweet oil.– Or: have a bottle three parts full of brandy, fill it quite full with the white leaves of the flowers of the garden lily, and cork it close. Lay some of the leaves on the wound, and keep it wet with the liquor. The root of the same lily is used to make strong poultices.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

When A Nail Is Run Into The Foot

December 8th, 2016

When a nail is run into the foot apply grated beet; keep the foot still, and elevated. Or, bathe in a strong tea of wormwood and then bind slices of fat bacon upon the wound.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Cure for Lockjaw, Said to be Positive

September 1st, 2016

Let anyone who has an attack of lockjaw take a small quantity of spirits of turpentine, warm it, and pour it in the wound–no matter where the wound is or what its nature is–and relief will follow in less than one minute. Turpentine is also a sovereign remedy for croup. Saturate a piece of flannel with it, and place the flannel on the throat and chest— and in very severe cases, three to five drops on a lump of sugar may be taken internally.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

In Cases of Serious Hemorrhage after Tooth-Extraction

April 24th, 2016

The plugging of the cavity with wool soaked in turpentine is at once rapid and effectual.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Bleeding, Unusual Way to Stop

December 19th, 2008

“If fresh, sprinkle full of black pepper. It will not smart, and is soon healed. If not fresh, clean with a weak solution saleratus and cover while wet with pepper. This has been tried many times in our home and has never failed.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Bleeding, Powdered Alum and Hot Water Stops

August 25th, 2008

“A heaping teaspoonful of powdered alum, placed in a teacup of water will stop the flow of blood in ordinary wounds, where no large artery has been cut. This will be found very beneficial for children, when their finger has been cut and bleeding badly.” Alum is something that should always be kept in the home, using it in a case of emergency when there is no time to run to the drug store.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Bleeding, Tobacco Will Stop

August 12th, 2008

“Bind in tobacco.” Very few people know that the nicotine in tobacco is very healing, and by applying it to a cut, not only stops the flow of blood, but heals.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter