To Remove Fish Odor From Hands

January 20th, 2022

A few drops of ammonia in the water in which you wash your hands will remove all fishy odor from the hands after preparing fish for cooking.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

Starch to Prevent Chapped Hands

January 8th, 2022

Use starch which is ground fine to prevent chapped hands. Every time the hands are washed and rinsed thoroughly, wipe them off, and, while they are yet damp, rub a pinch of starch over their entire surface. Chapping is then not likely to occur.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

Mutton Suet, The Value Of

December 1st, 2021

One drop of warm mutton suet applied to any sore at night, just before retiring, will soon cause it to disappear; the same for chapped hands or parched lips. If people only knew the value of the healing properties of so simple a thing no housekeeper would be without it. For cuts or bruises it is almost indispensable. Keep the wound clean, and put a little suet, melted, on a rag, and you will be astonished to see how soon the sore will heal.

Source: Fray’s Golden Recipes for the use of all ages, E. Fray

Itch, Lotions For

November 25th, 2021

Hydriodate of potash, two drams; distilled water, eight ounces. Apply frequently.

Equal parts of lime-water and linseed oil will also allay the irritation.

Or, after washing the body in warm water, apply the following : — Lime, two ounces ; sulphur-vivum, two ounces. Mix. Pour off the clear liquid for use.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Burdock

November 21st, 2021

The value of this plant cannot be too much known for its direct action on the blood, whether for scurvy, skin eruptions, leprosy, scrofula, venereal, ulcers, kidney disease, convulsions, fits, &c. It is invaluable. Two ounces to be used to three pints of water. This simmer down to two pints; take a gill three times a day.

Source: Fray’s Golden Recipes for the use of all ages, E. Fray

Salve

November 11th, 2021

Four ounces of mutton-tallow, two of beeswax, one of rosin, and one-half ounce of gum camphor. Simmer well together; take off the fire, and then add one gill of alcohol. Good for all kinds of sores and wounds.

Source: The Universal Cookery Book, Gertrude Strohm

Burns

October 16th, 2021

Anything which excludes air without tainting the wound or irritating it further helps a bad burn. Carron oil — a creamy mixture of lime water and sweet oil — applied with a feather, then covered with cotton, either batting or absorbent, gives a measure of relief and is also healing. Soft old linen coated with fresh egg-white laid on and allowed to dry soothes pain. Even a covering with dry flour, if nothing else is handy, is better than leaving the burn bare. But if at all serious, or even is shallow and wide spread, call a doctor instantly, meantime keeping up heart action with stimulants in small doses often repeated.

Source: Harper’s Household Handbook: A guide to easy ways of doing woman’s work, Martha McCulloch-Williams

Wasps and Bees, Stings From

September 10th, 2021

Mix together a little spirits of hartshorn with double its quantity of olive oil, and apply to the part affected.

Another very simple remedy, which is asserted to be unfailing, is to rub with an onion the part of the flesh which is stung.

The application of either oil of tartar or a solution of potash will give instant ease.

Perhaps the most convenient thing will be to mix a little oil with common soda. This will allay both the pain and the irritation.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Starch to Prevent Chapped Hands

August 3rd, 2021

Use starch which is ground fine to prevent chapped hands. Every time the hands are washed and rinsed thoroughly, wipe them off, and, while they are yet damp, rub a pinch of starch over their entire surface. Chapping is then not likely to occur.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

To Prevent A Blister On The Heel

July 28th, 2021

If shoes slip and cause blisters on the heels, rub paraffin on the stocking. In a short time the slipping will stop.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler