Coughs, Very Simple Remedy for

February 29th, 2008

“Take one-half tablespoonful hogs’ lard or salt pork grease, heat it hot, fill spoon with coal oil and swallow while hot. Have used this, will stop and cure the worst cough.” Not to be given to children.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Caked Breasts, Fresh Hops for

February 29th, 2008

“Fry one pint of fresh hops in a half cup of lard until the lard is a rich brown, then strain, set away to cool and use as a salve.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Hoarseness, Egg and Lemon for

February 29th, 2008

“Beaten white of one egg, juice of one lemon, with sugar enough to thicken, then add one teaspoonful olive oil.” Take one teaspoonful every hour until relieved.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Nosebleed; remedy sent us by a Public School Teacher

February 28th, 2008

“Make a compress of paper soaked in cold water; put it under the upper lip and have the patient press the lip with the fingers. Remarks.– Tried with success in many cases by a school teacher.” By putting under the lip and pressing on it, you press on an artery and stop bleeding. Be careful to use nothing but white paper, as ink or colors would come out when wet.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Sore throat, Splendid Liniment for

February 28th, 2008

“Olive oil 1/2 pint
Ammonia 1/2 pint
Turpentine 1/2 pint
One egg.

Shake till it forms emulsion. This can be used as a blister.”

This is a very effective remedy, but you must watch the throat very carefully as this will blister quickly. After removing the liniment, grease the parts with oil or cold cream.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Ingredients: Bennet Herb

February 28th, 2008

This, the Herba Benedicta, or Blessed Herb, or Avens (Geum Urbanum) is a very common plant of the Rose tribe, in our woods, hedges, and shady places. It has an erect hairy stem, red at the base, with terminal bright yellow drooping flowers. The ordinary name Avens — or Avance, Anancia, Enancia — signifies an antidote, because it was formerly thought to ward off the Devil, and evil spirits, and venomous beasts. Where the root is in a house Satan can do nothing, and flies from it: “therefore” (says Ortus Sanitatis) “it is blessed before all other herbs; and if a man carries the root about him no venomous beast can harm him.” The herb is sometimes called Way Bennet, and Wild Rye. Its graceful trefoiled loaf, and the fine golden petals of its flowers, symbolising the five wounds of Christ, were sculptured by the monks of the thirteenth century on their Church architecture. The botanical title of this plant, Geum, is got from Geuo, “to yield an agreeable fragrance,” in allusion to the roots. Hence also has been derived another appellation of the Avens — Radix Caryophyllata, or “clove root,” because when freshly dug out of the ground the roots smell like cloves. They yield tannin freely, with mucilage, resin, and muriate of lime, together with a heavy volatile oil. The roots are astringent and antiseptic, having been given in infusion for ague, and as an excellent cordial sudorific in chills, or for fresh catarrh. To make this a pint of boiling water should be poured on half an ounce of the dried root, or rather more of the fresh root, sliced. Half a wineglassful will be the dose, or ten grains of the powdered root. An extract is further made. When the petals of the flower fall off, a small round prickly ball is to be seen.

Source: Herbal Simples Approved for Modern Uses of Cure, William Thomas Fernie

Catarrh of head, Mullein Leaves. Treatment, etc., for

February 27th, 2008

“Smoke dried mullein leaves and blow the smoke through the nose, and in addition to this, put a heaping tablespoonful of powdered borax in a quart of soft water; syringe this up in the nose, and in addition to both of the above, frequently inhale a mixture of two drams of spirits of ammonia, half a dram tincture of iodine and fifteen drops of carbolic acid; smoke the mullein, syringe the borax water and inhale the last mixture all as frequently as convenient and it frequently will cure if kept up faithfully.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Convulsions in Children, Hot Mustard Water for

February 27th, 2008

“Put patient in tub of hot mustard water, with cold cloths to the head.” The hot mustard water draws the blood from the head to the feet and the cold cloths assist in doing good by keeping the blood away from the head. This is an old, tried and effective remedy.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Hiccough. Vinegar Stops

February 27th, 2008

“One teaspoonful of vinegar thickened with sugar and eaten slowly.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Convulsions in Children, A New York Mother’s Remedy for

February 26th, 2008

“Chloroform one-half dram, tincture of cardamom, one-half ounce, spearmint water, two and one-half ounces. Shake well and give one-half teaspoonful in water to child one year old, smaller children a proportionate dose.” The chloroform is very quieting, and the tincture of cardamom and spearmint act on the bowels. This combination will quiet the child, and in that way relieve the trouble.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter