Hints In Regard To Health (Part II)

September 3rd, 2018

(Continued from this post.)

  • Sprains and bruises call for an application of the tincture of arnica.
  • If an artery is severed, tie a small cord or handkerchief above it.
  • For bilious colic, soda and ginger in hot water. It may be taken freely.
  • Tickling in the throat is best relieved by a gargling of salt and water.
  • Pains in the side are most promptly relieved by the application of mustard.
  • For cold in the head nothing is better than powdered borax, sniffed up the nostrils.
  • A drink of hot, strong lemonade before going to bed will often break up a cold and cure a sore throat.
  • Nervous spasms are usually relieved by a little salt taken into the mouth and allowed to dissolve.
  • Whooping cough paroxysms are relieved by breathing the fumes of turpentine and carbolic acid.
  • Broken limbs should be placed in natural positions, and the patient kept quiet until the surgeon arrives.
  • Hemorrhages of the lungs or stomach are promptly checked by small doses of salt. The patient should be kept as quiet as possible.
  • Sleeplessness, caused by too much blood in the head may be overcome by applying a cloth wet with cold water to the back of the neck.
  • Wind colic is promptly relieved by peppermint essence taken in a little warm water. For small children it may be sweetened. Paregoric is also good.
  • For stomach cramps, ginger ale or a teaspoonful of the tincture of ginger in a half glass of water in which a half teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved.
  • Sickness of the stomach is most promptly relieved by drinking a teacupful of hot soda and water. If it brings the offending matter up, all the better.
  • A teaspoonful of ground mustard in a cupful of warm water is a prompt and reliable emetic, and should be resorted to in cases of poisoning or cramps in the stomach from over-eating.
  • Avoid purgatives or strong physic, as they not only do no good, but are positively hurtful. Pills may relieve for the time, but they seldom cure.
  • Powdered resin is the best thing to stop bleeding from cuts. After the powder is sprinkled on, wrap the wound with soft cotton cloth. As soon as the wound begins to feel feverish, keep the cloth wet with cold water.
  • Hot water is better than cold for bruises. It relieves pain quickly, and by preventing congestion often keeps off the ugly black and blue mark. “Children cry for it,” when they experience the relief it affords their bumps and bruises.
  • For a sprained ankle, the whites of eggs and powdered alum made into a plaster is almost a specific.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

For a Cold

March 11th, 2018

Take a quarter of a pint of horehound water a quarter of a pint of coltsfoot water a pound of reasons of the Sun Stoned pound the reasons very well then mingle these together then set them on the fire boyle them like marmolet then take it off and put it into 2 ounces of honey and one spoonfull mustard then set it on the fire & let it simer a while then put it into a pot and take as much as ye quantity of a walnut first in ye morning & last at night.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

To Break Up A Cold

December 31st, 2017

When you feel the first symptoms, take a Dover’s powder with a glass of hot lemonade or whisky punch, go to bed, wrap up warm, and by morning you will be entirely relieved. In addition the feet should be bathed in hot mustard water.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Remedy for Lockjaw

December 23rd, 2017

If any person is threatened or taken with lockjaw from injuries of the arms, legs or feet, do not wait for a doctor, but put the part injured in the following preparation: Put hot wood-ashes into water as warm as can be borne; if the injured part cannot be put into water, then wet thick folded cloths in the water and apply them to the part as soon as possible, at the same time bathe the backbone from the neck down with some laxative stimulant–say cayenne pepper and water, or mustard and water (good vinegar is better than water); it should be as hot as the patient can bear it. Don’t hesitate; go to work and do it, and don’t stop until the jaws will come open. No person need die of lockjaw if these directions are followed.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Chills

December 21st, 2017

Use heat. Apply hot-water bags under arms, on thighs and at feet. Give hot foot bath, in which is 1 tbsp. mustard. Rub limbs toward body, to restore circulation. Give hot coffee or tea, or hot lemonade. Wrap in blankets and put to bed. Chills indicate oncoming illness — see doctor!

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Hiccough

December 17th, 2017

Generally caused by indigestion.

Nine to fifteen swallows of water without taking a breath, or one or two soda-mint tablets, will generally give relief. If persistent, cause vomiting by tickling throat with fingers, or by swallowing a cup of warm water in which 1/2 tsp. mustard is dissolved.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Mustard Plaster

October 20th, 2017

Use whites of eggs to mix a mustard plaster and it will not blister.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Mustard Poultice

August 5th, 2017

Two ounces of dry mustard mixed with the whites of two eggs to a paste. Spread on a cloth in a thick paste and apply while it is fresh and wet.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

To Make A Mustard Plaster

April 29th, 2017

If you wish it to produce irritation immediately, mix some flour and water together quite stiff, spread this on your cloth and then sprinkle dry mustard on it quite thick, place a thin cloth over this and dampen with hot water. If you do not wish to raise a blister, mix the mustard up with the white of an egg and a little water. A poultice made in this way may be kept on an indefinite time without raising a blister.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

A Cure for Chilblains

April 21st, 2017

The pulp of a baked turnip beat up in a tea-cup with a table-spoonful of salad oil, ditto of mustard, and ditto of scraped horse-radish; apply this mixture to the chilblains, and tie it on with a piece of rag.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli