Boils

February 27th, 2019

If on a part exposed to friction of the clothes — the neck for instance — a boil should be protected by a piece of boracic lint strapped on with plaster. The gathering and discharge of a boil is hastened and the pain relieved by frequent bathing with water as hot as can be borne with comfort, containing a little boracic powder, lysol, or other disinfectant. Apply with a pad of cottonwool, which should be thrown away after use. In some cases a poultice of linseed — not bread — may be helpful; but there is a danger of poultices spreading infection and causing a crop of subsidiary boils. Very large boils, among which may be included carbuncles, may require lancing by a doctor at an early stage to give an outlet for the pus. As a rule a boil of the ordinary kind should be allowed to “ripen” fully before it is pricked, as by that time a core will have formed, the removal of which will allow the wound to heal quickly. After discharge dress the place with boracic ointment or powder to prevent reinfection, and keep it clean. Since boils are the result of a bad state of the blood, a person troubled by a succession of them should endeavour to improve the blood by means of purgatives, if he be constipated, and by exercise; or by taking cod-liver oil, iron, and nutritious food if “run down.”

The following treatment is said to be very effective: smear a little vaseline upon a piece of lint, pour a little chloroform on it, apply quickly to the boil and bind in place. Change the dressing every hour or so.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

For Colds on the Chest

January 8th, 2019

Rub with embrocation, or camphorated oil, on the throat and chest, afterwards covering them with flannel or Thermogen. Give a cough mixture to relieve the cough. A linseed poultice will become necessary for a case of bronchitis, croup, pneumonia or pleurisy.

Source: Household Management, E. Stoddard Eckford & M.S. Fitzgerald

For Burns – Good

January 28th, 2018

In one pint of linseed oil mix as much lime water as it will cut.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Linseed Poultice

August 29th, 2017

Four ounces linseed meal and ten ounces of boiling water. Mix gradually. Dip spoon in boiling water when you spread this mixture on the poultice cloth. Bind on inflamed parts.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

How to make a Soothing Drink for Coughs

May 5th, 2017

Take of marsh-mallow roots and of liquorice roots each one ounce; of linseed, half an ounce; shave the roots very thinly; put them and the linseed into a clean earthen pot with one quart of hot water, cover with the lid, and set the whole on the hob of the fire to simmer for half an hour or more; then strain the drink into a clean jug, sweeten with honey, and when it has become quite cold, let it be given in small quantities several times in the course of the day. This mucilaginous beverage is most beneficial in relieving persons who are suffering from cold on the chest, and also those who are afflicted with gravel, etc.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

How to make a Cordial for Colds

March 10th, 2017

First, prepare a quart of the juice of black currants, by bruising and boiling them for twenty minutes, and then straining off the juice with great pressure through a sieve into a basin. Next, boil four ounces of linseed in a quart of water until reduced to one-third of its original quantity, taking care that it does not boil fast, and, when done, strain the liquid into a very clean saucepan; add the currant juice, two pounds of moist sugar, and half an ounce of citric acid, or one pint of lemon juice; boil all together until reduced to a thick syrup—that is, when it begins to run rather thick from the spoon without resembling treacle; as soon as the syrup has reached this stage, remove it from the fire, and pour it into a jug to become quite cold. This syrup will keep good for any length of time, if bottled and corked down tight, and kept in a cool place. A tea-spoonful taken occasionally will soon relieve the most troublesome cough.

This cordial may also be prepared in winter, using for the purpose black currant jam, or preserved black currant juice, instead of the juice of fresh-gathered currants.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

Linseed Tea

February 6th, 2017

Put a table-spoonful of linseed into a clean earthen pot or pipkin with a quart of water, and a little orange or lemon rind; boil this gently for about ten minutes, and then strain it through muslin into a jug; sweeten with honey or sugar, add the juice of a lemon, stir all together, and give this beverage to allay irritation of the chest and lungs—in the latter case, the lemon juice had better be omitted. Linseed tea in its purest form is an excellent accessory in aiding to relieve such as are afflicted with gout, gravel, etc.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

For a Burn

December 22nd, 2016

Make half a tumbler of strong lime water, let it set a few minutes; then strain the water through a thin muslin to the same quantity of linseed or sweet oil (neat’s or hog’s foot will answer); mix it well, and spread over the burn; wrap over linen cloths. Do not remove the cloth for several days; saturate it frequently with the lime and oil until the inflammation is subdued. Should the odor become offensive, apply cold poultices of the flour of slippery elm; spread over with pulverized charcoal. A plaster of lard and soot is also good for a burn. Heal with any simple salve — a very good one is made by stewing together heart leaves, white lily root, agrimony, a few leaves of the Jamestown weed, and sweet gum. When the strength of the herbs is extracted, strain the water; throw away leaves, etc.; add fresh unsalted butter, and simmer gently until the water has evaporated. Keep this on hand for common sores, in a close-covered box.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Linseed Oil with Lime

March 23rd, 2016

Take of:

  • Linseed oil,
  • Lime water,

of each equal parts. Mix them.

This liniment is extremely useful in cases of scalds or burns, being singularly efficacious in preventing, if applied in time, the inflammation subsequent to burns or scalds; or even in removing it, after it has come on.

It is also a species of soap, and might be called Soap of Lime, although it probably contains a great excess of oil.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

Burns

February 28th, 2016

Make a thick paste of molasses and flour, or castile soap and flour, covering the parts so as to entirely exclude the air. For a deep burn, dress daily with lime water and linseed oil, equal parts.

Source: The Kansas Home Cook-Book