For Burns or Scalds

June 8th, 2021

Keep in a bottle, tightly corked, 1/2 oz. of trefoil, and the same of sweet oil; apply with a feather, immediately that the accident has occurred. Linseed or olive oil, applied instantly, will draw out the fire; treacle will have the same effect, and is recommended by some persons, in preference to anything else. Others say that fine flour, applied instantly, is the best thing; as soon as it becomes warm, replace it with fresh. Wadding also laid on the part instantly is good to draw out the fire.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Elder Ointment

May 27th, 2021

Melt 3 lbs. of mutton suet in 1 pint of olive oil, and boil in it 4 lbs. weight of elder flowers, full blown, till nearly crisp; then strain, and press out the ointment.– Another: take 4 oz. each, of the inner bark of the elder tree, and the leaves, boil them in 2 pints of linseed oil, and 6 oz. of white wax. Press it through a strainer.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Cure for Burns

January 31st, 2020

One-third part linseed oil.
Two-thirds lime water.

Shake up well; apply and wrap in soft linen.

Until you can procure this keep the part covered with wood-soot mixed to a soft paste with lard, or, if you have not these, with common molasses.

Source: Common Sense in the Household, Marion Harland

For Fresh Burns, Scalds, Etc.

January 9th, 2020

Take equal parts of lime water and raw linseed oil, shake well together, saturate an old linen cloth and apply to the burn. Be sure and keep the cloth well saturated.

Source: Flint Hills Cook Book

For Burns

April 14th, 2019

When the skin is not off, apply scraped raw potatoes. When the skin is off, apply sweet oil and cotton, or linseed oil and lime water made into a paste. Elder ointment is very good: make the ointment of the green bark of the elder; stew in lard.

Source: The Philadelphia Housewife, Mary Hodgson

For Burns – Good

January 28th, 2018

In one pint of linseed oil mix as much lime water as it will cut.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Furniture Polish

April 9th, 2017

Mix two tablespoonfuls of sweet or linseed oil with a tablespoonful of turpentine, and rub on with a piece of flannel, polishing with a dry piece.

Source: The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, H. Campbell

For a Burn

December 22nd, 2016

Make half a tumbler of strong lime water, let it set a few minutes; then strain the water through a thin muslin to the same quantity of linseed or sweet oil (neat’s or hog’s foot will answer); mix it well, and spread over the burn; wrap over linen cloths. Do not remove the cloth for several days; saturate it frequently with the lime and oil until the inflammation is subdued. Should the odor become offensive, apply cold poultices of the flour of slippery elm; spread over with pulverized charcoal. A plaster of lard and soot is also good for a burn. Heal with any simple salve — a very good one is made by stewing together heart leaves, white lily root, agrimony, a few leaves of the Jamestown weed, and sweet gum. When the strength of the herbs is extracted, strain the water; throw away leaves, etc.; add fresh unsalted butter, and simmer gently until the water has evaporated. Keep this on hand for common sores, in a close-covered box.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Linseed Oil with Lime

March 23rd, 2016

Take of:

  • Linseed oil,
  • Lime water,

of each equal parts. Mix them.

This liniment is extremely useful in cases of scalds or burns, being singularly efficacious in preventing, if applied in time, the inflammation subsequent to burns or scalds; or even in removing it, after it has come on.

It is also a species of soap, and might be called Soap of Lime, although it probably contains a great excess of oil.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

Burns

February 28th, 2016

Make a thick paste of molasses and flour, or castile soap and flour, covering the parts so as to entirely exclude the air. For a deep burn, dress daily with lime water and linseed oil, equal parts.

Source: The Kansas Home Cook-Book