For a Burn

December 22nd, 2016

Make half a tumbler of strong lime water, let it set a few minutes; then strain the water through a thin muslin to the same quantity of linseed or sweet oil (neat’s or hog’s foot will answer); mix it well, and spread over the burn; wrap over linen cloths. Do not remove the cloth for several days; saturate it frequently with the lime and oil until the inflammation is subdued. Should the odor become offensive, apply cold poultices of the flour of slippery elm; spread over with pulverized charcoal. A plaster of lard and soot is also good for a burn. Heal with any simple salve — a very good one is made by stewing together heart leaves, white lily root, agrimony, a few leaves of the Jamestown weed, and sweet gum. When the strength of the herbs is extracted, strain the water; throw away leaves, etc.; add fresh unsalted butter, and simmer gently until the water has evaporated. Keep this on hand for common sores, in a close-covered box.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book

Drink for Jaundice

September 21st, 2008

Tie up soot and saffron, equal parts, in a cloth to the size of half of a hen’s egg, let it lie in a glass of water over night; in the morning put the yolk of an egg, beaten, into this water and drink it. Do this 3 mornings, skipping 3, until 9 doses have been taken.

Source: Dr Chase’s Recipes, or Information for Everybody, A.W. Chase

News: Remember days of home remedies?

February 13th, 2008

“Modern medicine could be spelled m-i-r-a-c-l-e, and I wouldn’t object. It seems that even as more and more unbelievable strides are made, the gains come even faster and faster.

I still marvel at the progress of medicine even in my lifetime. When I was a kid, medicine had not stumbled much beyond home remedies, some of which worked, and some didn’t.”

Full story: Beaumont Journal, 13th February 2008