Chilblains

November 12th, 2016

Place red-hot coals in a vessel and throw upon them a handful of corn meal. Hold the feet in the dense smoke, renewing the coals and meal till the pain is relieved. This has been known to make very marked cures, when all other remedies have failed.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

To Cure Earache

June 15th, 2016

Take a bit of cotton batting, put on it a pinch of black pepper, gather it up and tie it, dip it in sweet oil, and insert it in the ear; put a flannel bandage over the head to keep it warm; it often gives immediate relief.

Tobacco smoke, puffed into the ear, has often been effectual.

Another remedy: Take equal parts of tincture of opium and glycerine. Mix, and from a warm teaspoon drop two or three drops into the ear, stop the ear tight with cotton, and repeat every hour or two. If matter should form in the ear, make a suds with castile soap and warm water, about 100° F., or a little more than milk warm, and have some person inject it into the ear while you hold that side of your head the lowest. If it does not heal in due time, inject a little carbolic acid and water in the proportion of one drachm of the acid to one pint of warm water each time after using the suds.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Earache

December 6th, 2015

There are various ways of treating earache: the most old fashioned are the appliance of a roasted onion, or a hot bag of salt to the ear, and putting in the ear a small piece of cotton wet with camphorated oil, or simple olive-oil with a drop of chloroform; better still, to puff tobacco smoke into the ear. This remedy is very soothing and effective.

Or, take a small wax taper, pare one end quite small, envelop it in a dry linen rag, insert it into the ear; then light the taper. Odd as this remedy may seem, it is wonderfully rapid and effective; it is practised by all Italian sailors and fishermen.

In Kentucky, a cockroach is drowned in whiskey, then wrapped in hot cotton, and applied to the ear.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Preservatives against the ravages of Moths

September 19th, 2015

Moths are very apt to eat woollen and fur garments early in the summer. To keep them from the garments, take them late in the spring, when not worn, and put them in a chest, with considerable camphor gum. Cedar chips, or tobacco leaves, are also good for this purpose. When moths get into garments, the best thing to destroy them is to hang the garments in a closet, and make a strong smoke of tobacco leaves under them. In order to do it, have a pan of live coals in the closet, and sprinkle on the tobacco leaves.

Source: The American Housewife

For Asthma

August 12th, 2015

For asthma soak blotting paper in strong saltpeter water; dry, and burn at night.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Cure for Lockjaw

August 4th, 2015

Twenty minutes in the smoke of wool or woolen cloth will take the pain out of the worst case of inflammation arising from any wound. All danger from lock-jaw will be removed if this remedy is resorted to.

Source: Mrs Owens’ Cook Book and Useful Household Hints, Frances Owens

For Morphew, or Freckles, and to clear the Skin

June 29th, 2015

Take the Blood of any Fowl or Beast, and wipe your Face all over with it every night when you go to bed for a fortnight together, and the next day wash it all off with White Wine, and white Sugar Candy, and sometimes hold your face over the smoke of Brimstone for a while, and shut your eyes, if you add the Juice of a Limon to the white Wine, it will be the better.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

For a Dry, Irritating Cough

May 3rd, 2015

Smoke in a common clean pipe equal quantities of ground coffee and rich pine saw-dust. My husband finds almost instant relief when his throat and lungs are sore. Swallow all the smoke you can.

Source: Mrs Owens’ Cook Book and Useful Household Hints, Frances Owens

Rusty Nail Wound, Simple Guard Against Serious Results from

April 18th, 2008

“Every little while we read of someone who has run a rusty nail in his foot or some other part of his person, and lockjaw has resulted therefrom. All such wounds can be healed without any fatal consequences following them. It is only necessary to smoke such wounds or any wound or bruise that is inflamed, with burning wood or woolen cloth. Twenty minutes in the smoke will take the pain out of the worst case of inflammation arising from any wound I ever saw.” Put on a poultice of bread and milk, changing every five or ten minutes. After this bind on salt pork and keep on for several days.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

News: Remember days of home remedies?

February 13th, 2008

“Modern medicine could be spelled m-i-r-a-c-l-e, and I wouldn’t object. It seems that even as more and more unbelievable strides are made, the gains come even faster and faster.

I still marvel at the progress of medicine even in my lifetime. When I was a kid, medicine had not stumbled much beyond home remedies, some of which worked, and some didn’t.”

Full story: Beaumont Journal, 13th February 2008