Remedy for Corns

June 2nd, 2017

When corns are troublesome make a shield of buckskin leather an inch or two across, with a hole cut in the center the size of the corn; touch the exposed spot with pyroligneous acid which will eat it away in a few applications. Besides this a strong mixture of carbolic acid, and glycerine is good, say one-half as much acid as glycerine. Turpentine may also be used for corns and bunions. A weaker solution of carbolic acid will heal soft corns between the toes. A French medical journal reports the cure of the most refactory corns by the morning and evening application with a brush of a drop of a solution of the perchloride of iron. It states, that after a fortnight’s continued application, without pain, a patient who had suffered martyrdom for nearly forty years was entirely relieved.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Preparation for Rough Skin

October 23rd, 2016

A delicate and effective preparation for rough skins, eruptive diseases, cuts or ulcers, is found in a mixture of one ounce of glycerine, half an ounce of rosemary-water, and twenty drops of carbolic acid. In those dreaded irritations of the skin, occurring in summer, such as hives or prickly heat, this wash gives soothing relief. A solution of this acid, say fifty drops to an ounce of the glycerine, applied at night, forms a protection from mosquitoes. Use the pure crystallized form: it is far less overpowering in its fragrance than the common sort, Those who dislike it too much to use at night, will find the sting of the bites almost miraculously cured, and the blotches removed by touching them with the mixture in the morning. Babies and children should be touched with it in a reduced form. Two or three drops of otter of roses in the preparation will improve the smell so as to render it tolerable to human beings though not so to mosquitoes.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Treatment of Scarlet Fever

September 11th, 2016

Rubbing the body with hogs’ lard or fat reduces the temperature of the skin. A celebrated German physician recommends to incorporate one or two grammes of carbolic acid, into one hundred grammes of lard, and with this to rub the whole body, excepting the head, two or three times a day. The acid operates to destroy the germs or spores of the disease, the lard softens the skin and reduces the temperature.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

To Cure Earache

June 15th, 2016

Take a bit of cotton batting, put on it a pinch of black pepper, gather it up and tie it, dip it in sweet oil, and insert it in the ear; put a flannel bandage over the head to keep it warm; it often gives immediate relief.

Tobacco smoke, puffed into the ear, has often been effectual.

Another remedy: Take equal parts of tincture of opium and glycerine. Mix, and from a warm teaspoon drop two or three drops into the ear, stop the ear tight with cotton, and repeat every hour or two. If matter should form in the ear, make a suds with castile soap and warm water, about 100° F., or a little more than milk warm, and have some person inject it into the ear while you hold that side of your head the lowest. If it does not heal in due time, inject a little carbolic acid and water in the proportion of one drachm of the acid to one pint of warm water each time after using the suds.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Toothache Wax

April 10th, 2016

Into two parts of melted white wax or spermaceti one part of carbolic acid crystals and two parts of chloral hydrate crystals are introduced, and the whole well stirred. Into this liquid thin layers of carbolized cotton wool are introduced and allowed to dry. A plug of this, slightly warmed, inserted into a hollow tooth, is said to give immediate relief.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Remedy for Toothache

March 27th, 2016

First wash the mouth well with warm water, then use the following tincture: Tannin, 10 grains; gum mastic, 1/2 drachm; 10 drops of carbolic acid; dissolve in 1/2 ounce of sulphuric ether. Paint the decayed hollow of the aching tooth over with this tincture twice or thrice, using a camel’s hair brush. The tincture will remain in good condition for a month or more, provided care is taken to keep it in a vial with a glass stopper.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Bunions

March 18th, 2015

These painful enlargements are due to a too short shoe, or one that does not fit well. Better discard such footwear; it will be cheaper in the end. Paint the sore joint with a mixture of equal parts of glycerin, tincture of iodine and carbolic acid; using a camel’s hairbrush. Stockings that are too short may produce the same affliction.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Bites, Carbolic Acid Draws Poison from

December 11th, 2008

“Bathe frequently in a weak solution of carbolic acid.” The carbolic acid is a very good remedy and seldom fails to cure, but if you do not happen to have the acid, use vinegar, and it will have practically the same effect.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Catarrh of head, Mullein Leaves. Treatment, etc., for

February 27th, 2008

“Smoke dried mullein leaves and blow the smoke through the nose, and in addition to this, put a heaping tablespoonful of powdered borax in a quart of soft water; syringe this up in the nose, and in addition to both of the above, frequently inhale a mixture of two drams of spirits of ammonia, half a dram tincture of iodine and fifteen drops of carbolic acid; smoke the mullein, syringe the borax water and inhale the last mixture all as frequently as convenient and it frequently will cure if kept up faithfully.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Chafing and Redness

February 19th, 2008

Chafing and Redness, which so often occurs in the folds of children’s soft little bodies, should be treated by absolute cleanliness, with the use of a non-irritating soap, and a simple dusting powder to keep it dry. A little absorbent cotton wool may be laid between the folds with the following powder well applied over it: Thymol, one grain; powdered oxide of zinc, one ounce. Or the following application may be used to protect the parts from irritating discharges: Salicylic acid, ten grains; sub-nitrate of bismuth and powdered starch, of each, three drachms; cold cream, a sufficiency to one ounce. Mix, and smear over the surface.

For still more severe cases and mild cases of eczema the following is useful: Powdered tragacanth, fifteen grains; glycerine, twenty-four drops; water to one ounce. To which add: Oxide of zinc, one drachm; carbolic acid, one grain.

Source: Home Notes, January 1895.