Perspiring Feet

January 6th, 2022

If the feet perspire, add a few drops of ammonia to the water when bathing them, and bathe them often. The unpleasant odour from perspiring feet may be prevented by sprinkling oatmeal in the socks, as used in the army; or, sprinkle bran in the socks frequently. Try either with good effect.

Source: Fray’s Golden Recipes for the use of all ages, E. Fray

Sinapisms

December 11th, 2021

The sinapism is a poultice made of vinegar instead of milk, and rendered warm and stimulating by the addition of mustard, horseradish, or garlic. The common sinapism is made of equal quantities of bread crumbs and mustard, a sufficient quantity of strong vinegar, and mixing all together into a poultice. When a sinapism is required to be more stimulating, a little bruised garlic may be added. Sinapisms are employed to recal the blood and spirits to a weak part, as in the case of palsy; they are also of service in deep-seated pains, as in the case of sciatica. When the gout seizes the head or stomach, they are applied to the feet to bring the disorder down, and are likewise applied to the soles of the feet in a low state of fever. They should not be suffered to lie on till they have raised blisters, but till the parts become red, and will continue so when pressed with the finger.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Bunions, Ointment For

November 19th, 2021

To half an ounce of spermaceti ointment or lard add twelve grains of iodine. Rub the mixture on two or three times a day.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Influenza, To Remove

September 16th, 2021

Place the feet in hot water, with a blanket spread over the knees, for twenty minutes, then, without stopping to dry them, dab off the majority of the water; place the feet in a warm blanket at the moment of getting into bed, and drink a glassful of hot lemonade.

Or, mix a quarter of a pound of ginger, an ounce and a half of cayenne pepper, and a quarter of an ounce of cloves. Dissolve a teaspoonful in a cupful of water, sweeten to taste, and take at bed-time.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Cure for Chilblains

May 29th, 2021

Beat up 1 egg and put it into a bottle with equal parts of white vinegar and turpentine. Shake up. It should be of the consistency of cream.

Source: The Northampton Cookery Book, M.A. Jeffery

Preventive Against Chilblains

February 27th, 2021

Rub the toes, or other parts of the feet likely to become affected, every morning and night with a mixture of one part camphorated spirit and three parts vinegar.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Salve for Chilblains

September 22nd, 2020

Try out nicely a little mutton tallow; into this while melted, (after it is nicely strained) put an equal quantity of coal oil. Stir well together until it cools.

Source: Tried and True Recipes, F.D.P. Jermain

Frostbitten Feet

September 20th, 2020

One of the best cures ever invented for Frostbitten Feet.

Take about six quarts chicken dung and stir it with about two gallons boiling water in a bucket, then place a small board across the bucket, on which you can put your feet and cover your feet up till the mixture is sufficiently cool to put them in, then keep them in till it gets cold.

Source: Recipes: Information for Everybody, J.F. Landis

For Croup

June 25th, 2020

Wring cloths out of hot water, as hot as possible, and put around the throat and cover well. Change two or three times. If this does not relieve, give an emetic. If the child is suffering with a severe attack, give the emetic at once; apply hot water to the throat and rub the chest with sweet oil or lard, and soak the feet in hot water and cover well with woolen, when taken out of the water.

Source: Tried and True Recipes, F.D.P. Jermain

Cure for Chilblains

March 23rd, 2020

Bathe the feet in hot water, dry thoroughly before the fire, then rub with the following as long as possible. Take a piece of butter the size of a walnut with as much salt as can be worked into it. One or two applications will generally cure the worst cases.

Source: The New Galt Cook Book, M. Taylor & F. McNaught