Salve for Chilblains

September 22nd, 2020

Try out nicely a little mutton tallow; into this while melted, (after it is nicely strained) put an equal quantity of coal oil. Stir well together until it cools.

Source: Tried and True Recipes, F.D.P. Jermain

Frostbitten Feet

September 20th, 2020

One of the best cures ever invented for Frostbitten Feet.

Take about six quarts chicken dung and stir it with about two gallons boiling water in a bucket, then place a small board across the bucket, on which you can put your feet and cover your feet up till the mixture is sufficiently cool to put them in, then keep them in till it gets cold.

Source: Recipes: Information for Everybody, J.F. Landis

For Croup

June 25th, 2020

Wring cloths out of hot water, as hot as possible, and put around the throat and cover well. Change two or three times. If this does not relieve, give an emetic. If the child is suffering with a severe attack, give the emetic at once; apply hot water to the throat and rub the chest with sweet oil or lard, and soak the feet in hot water and cover well with woolen, when taken out of the water.

Source: Tried and True Recipes, F.D.P. Jermain

Cure for Chilblains

March 23rd, 2020

Bathe the feet in hot water, dry thoroughly before the fire, then rub with the following as long as possible. Take a piece of butter the size of a walnut with as much salt as can be worked into it. One or two applications will generally cure the worst cases.

Source: The New Galt Cook Book, M. Taylor & F. McNaught

An Ingrowing Toe Nail

March 9th, 2020

Put a small piece of tallow in a spoon and heat it very hot and pour it over the granulations. This acts like magic.

Source: The New Galt Cook Book, M. Taylor & F. McNaught

To Cure Corns

January 23rd, 2020

A little sweet oil rubbed in night and morning, if persevered in, will, after a fortnight, quite cure them.

Source: Household Gas Cookery Book, Helen Edden

For Aching Feet

March 9th, 2019

Any one who has aching feet, if the feet are placed in kerosene for about ten minutes each day will receive the greatest relief. If used regularly for a month is said to cure all corns and callous places on the feet. Will not blister or do any injury.

Source: The Just-Wed Cook Book

Chilblains

March 1st, 2019

Due to bad circulation in the parts affected — the hands, feet, and ears. A person addicted to chilblains should wear thick, warm underclothing on arms and legs, and avoid garters or anything which tends to check the circulation. As the blood comes very near the surface at the wrists, it will be less chilled before entering the hands if woollen wristlets be worn indoors in cold weather. Thick-soled boots, lined with cork “socks”, will help to prevent chilblains in the feet when standing about in cold, damp weather. Cold draughts round the feet indoors, and standing on cold flooring while dressing and undressing are productive of chilblains in the toes. Daily baths as cold as suits, followed by brisk rubbing, and plenty of exercise and good food, will do a great deal to keep chilblains at bay. If they appear, however, bathing in hot water, followed by squeezing of the swellings with the fingers and the application of camphorated oil, helps to stop the itching. Broken chilblains should be treated like chapped hands. In cases where the cracks are very feep care must be taken to prevent infection by dressing with boracic lint and powder like other open wounds.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Corns – A Sure Cure and Painless Eradication

December 29th, 2018

Extract of Cannabis Indicus ten grs., Salicylic Acid 6 grs., Collodion one oz. Mix and apply with a camel’s hair pencil so as to form a thick covering over the corn for 3 or 4 nights. Take a hot foot bath and the corn can easily be removed with the aid of a knife.

Source: One Thousand Secrets of Wise and Rich Men Revealed, C. A. Bogardus

Corn Remedy

November 15th, 2018

Soak a piece of copper in strong vinegar for twelve or twenty-four hours. Pour the liquid off, and bottle. Apply frequently, till the corn is removed.

Source: Our Knowledge Box, ed. G. Blackie