A Cure for Cold in the Head

May 19th, 2017

Thirty drops of camphorated sal volatile in a small wine-glassful of hot water, taken several times in the course of the day.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

A Splendid Hair Tonic

April 25th, 2017

A strong tincture for the hair is made by adding half an ounce of oil of mace to a pint of deodorized alcohol. Pour a spoonful or two into a saucer; dip a small stiff brush into it, and brush the hair smartly, rubbing the tincture well into the roots. On bald spots, if hair will start at all, it may be stimulated by friction with a piece of flannel until the skin looks red, and rubbing the tincture into the scalp. This process must be repeated three times a day for weeks. When the hair begins to grow, apply the tincture once a day until the growth is well established, bathing the head in cold water every morning, and briskly brushing it to bring the blood to the surface.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

A Simple and Harmless Hair Dye

April 15th, 2017

“It is said that the water in which potatoes have been boiled with the skins on forms a speedy and harmless dye for the hair and eyebrows. The pareings of potatoes before cooking may be boiled by themselves, and the water strained off for use. To apply it the shoulders should be covered with cloths to protect the dress and a fine comb dipped in the water drawn through the hair, wetting it at each stroke, until the head is thoroughly soaked. Let the hair dry thoroughly before putting it up. If the result is not satisfactory the first time, repeat the wetting with a sponge, taking care not to discolor the skin of the brow and neck. No hesitation need be felt about trying this, for potato-water is a safe article used in the household in a variety of ways. It relieves chilblains if the feet are soaked in it while the water is hot, and is said to ease rheumatic gout.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Hair Dye

January 9th, 2017

Nitric acid, one part ; nitrate of silver, ten parts ; sap green, nine parts ; powdered gum arabic, two parts ; water, three hundred parts ; essence musii, one or two drops to each bottle. Mix. In all cases, first free the hair from grease, by soap and water. All hair dyes must be applied by means of moistening a comb with them, and passing it through the hair, observing not to touch the skin with the dye.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

A Sovereign Remedy for Earache

November 10th, 2016

As soon as a child complains of earache, give it sufficient syrup of ipecac to vomit it freely. It will act like a charm, and the child will be asleep and free from the pain fifteen minutes afterwards. If a mother will only use this remedy she will save her child from a great deal of suffering, and herself from many sleepless nights. My plan is to give a teaspoonful of ipecac, after waiting ten or fifteen minutes (giving the child in the mean time plenty of water to drink,) if it then does not produce the desired effect, give another spoonful, this last will usually be sufficient.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

The Best Way To Wash Hair

September 21st, 2016

Rub the white of an egg into the roots, making partings for the purpose. Some use yolks and white beaten together. Rub the head all over whilst the egg is about it. Wash well with soap and tepid water. When clean pour some water as warm as can be borne over the head, and immediately afterwards some water quite cold. A pint basin is a good medium for applying this douche. Fill it and empty on the back of the head, holding the face over a large basin. Wring the water out of the hair. Rub the scalp, till it glows, round and round with a rough towel. Roll up the hair next, and tie a towel round the wet head; after awhile take it off. The hair then is nearly dry, and the head warm. Brush the hair with a clean brush, and spread it out. Do not dress it till quite dry.

Source: Cassell’s Household Guide

Sunstroke

September 13th, 2016

Wrap a wet cloth bandage over the head; wet another cloth, folded small, square, cover it thickly with salt, and bind it on the back of the neck; apply dry salt behind the ears. Put mustard plasters to the calves of the legs and soles of the feet. This is an effectual remedy.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

For Headache

July 13th, 2016

For headache, drink a cup of strong black tea, in which has been squeezed the juice of a lemon. Half a teaspoon of common baking soda dissolved in hot water is also good.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Sunstroke

November 28th, 2015

Bind the head with wet cloths; wet another cloth, fold into a small square, cover thickly with salt, and apply to the back of the neck; apply dry salt behind the ears, and mustard plasters to the calves of the legs and soles of the feet. The salt is an Arabian remedy, and is very effective.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

To make the true Palsie-water, as it was given by that once very famous Physician Doctor Matthias

July 31st, 2015

Take Lavender Flowers stripped from the stalks, and fill a Gallon-Glass with them, and pour on them good Spirit of Sack, or perfect Aqua vitæ distilled from all Flegm, let the quantity be five quarts, then circulate them for six weeks, very close with a Bladder, that nothing may breath out; let them stand in a warm place, then distil them in an Alembeck with his Cooler, then put into the said water, of Sage, Rosemary, and Wood-Betony Flowers; of each half a handful, of Lilly of the Valley, and Burrage, Bugloss, and Cowslip Flowers, one handful of each; steep these in Spirit of Wine, Malmsie, or Aqua vitæ, every one in their Season, till all may be had; then put also to them of Balm, Motherwort, Spike-flowers, Bay leaves, the leaves of Orange trees, with the Flowers, if they may be had, of each one ounce, put them into the aforesaid distilled Wine all together, and distil it as before, having first been steeped six weeks; when you have distilled it, put into it Citron Pill, dried Piony seeds hull’d, of each five Drams, of Cinamon half an Ounce, of Nutmegs, Cardamum seeds, Cubebs[1], and yellow Saunders[2], of each half an ounce, of lignum Aloes one dram; make all these into Powder, and put them into the distilled Wine abovesaid, and put to them of Cubebs anew, a good half pound of Dates, the stones taken out, and cut them in small pieces, put all these in, and close your Vessel well with a double Bladder; let them digest six weeks, then strain it hard with a Press, and filtrate the Liquor, then put into it of prepared Pearl, Smaragdus[3], Musk and Saffron, of each half a Scruple; and of Ambergreece one Scruple, red Roses dried well, Red and Yellow Saunders, of each one ounce, hang these in a Sarsenet[4] Bag in the water, being well sewed that nothing go out.

The virtues of this Water

This Water is of exceeding virtue in all Swoundings and Weaknesses of the heart, and decaying of Spirits in all Apoplexies and Palsies, also in all pains of the Joints coming of Cold, for all Bruises outwardly bathed and dipped Clothes laid to; it strengtheneth and comforteth all animal, natural and viral Spirits, and cheareth the external Senses, strengtheneth the Memory, restoreth lost Speech, and lost Appetite, all weakness of the Stomach, being both taken inwardly, and bathed outwardly; it taketh away the Giddiness of the Head, helpeth lost Hearing, it maketh a pleasant Breath, helpeth all cold disposition of the Liver, and a beginning Dropsie; it helpeth all cold Diseases of the Mother; indeed none can express sufficiently; it is to be taken morning and evening, about half a Spoonful with Crums of Bread and Sugar.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

1. A type of pepper.

2. Sandalwood.

3. Emerald.

4. A type of fine silk.