For the Giddiness in the Head

February 27th, 2018

Take an ounce of comming Seed and Steep it in white wine all night as much wine as will cover it and then you must dry it in an oven after the bread is drawn and dry with it an ounce of Juniper berrys & a handfull of rue then you must beat all these together to a fine powder and when you use it take as much of the powder as will lay on a Sixpence in a Spoonfull of honey well mixed together or in a Spoonfull of Sugar and take it dry.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

Nosebleed

February 3rd, 2018

Head in upright position. Raise arm on bleeding side. Loosen collar. Apply ice in a cloth to bridge of nose and back of neck. A roll of paper under upper lip. Snuff cold tea up nose, or salt water, 1 tsp. to cup water, or the same of powdered alum.

If bleeding continues, tie a small wad of cotton with thread; dip it into peroxide of hydrogen, and plug nostril by pushing the cotton gently with a pencil. The thread is used to withdraw cotton.

If these means fail, send for doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Hints to Young Ladies (II)

January 2nd, 2018

Never use a fine comb to the head, but keep the scalp clean with a solution of ammonia and water, used several times a week, and then give the head a thorough brushing afterwards. A child’s head especially is too tender for the use of a fine comb. The proportions are two or three spoonfuls to a basin of water. Apply with a brush and dry well with a soft towel.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Lice in Hair (Pediculosis)

December 3rd, 2017

Wash hair with kerosene, leaving it on over night; or use tincture of larkspur in the same way.

Perhaps the best remedy is fishberries.

Five cents worth of the berries may be boiled in 1 pint water for ten minutes.

Wash hair next day after using any of these remedies.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

A Cure for Cold in the Head

May 19th, 2017

Thirty drops of camphorated sal volatile in a small wine-glassful of hot water, taken several times in the course of the day.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

A Splendid Hair Tonic

April 25th, 2017

A strong tincture for the hair is made by adding half an ounce of oil of mace to a pint of deodorized alcohol. Pour a spoonful or two into a saucer; dip a small stiff brush into it, and brush the hair smartly, rubbing the tincture well into the roots. On bald spots, if hair will start at all, it may be stimulated by friction with a piece of flannel until the skin looks red, and rubbing the tincture into the scalp. This process must be repeated three times a day for weeks. When the hair begins to grow, apply the tincture once a day until the growth is well established, bathing the head in cold water every morning, and briskly brushing it to bring the blood to the surface.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

A Simple and Harmless Hair Dye

April 15th, 2017

“It is said that the water in which potatoes have been boiled with the skins on forms a speedy and harmless dye for the hair and eyebrows. The pareings of potatoes before cooking may be boiled by themselves, and the water strained off for use. To apply it the shoulders should be covered with cloths to protect the dress and a fine comb dipped in the water drawn through the hair, wetting it at each stroke, until the head is thoroughly soaked. Let the hair dry thoroughly before putting it up. If the result is not satisfactory the first time, repeat the wetting with a sponge, taking care not to discolor the skin of the brow and neck. No hesitation need be felt about trying this, for potato-water is a safe article used in the household in a variety of ways. It relieves chilblains if the feet are soaked in it while the water is hot, and is said to ease rheumatic gout.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Hair Dye

January 9th, 2017

Nitric acid, one part ; nitrate of silver, ten parts ; sap green, nine parts ; powdered gum arabic, two parts ; water, three hundred parts ; essence musii, one or two drops to each bottle. Mix. In all cases, first free the hair from grease, by soap and water. All hair dyes must be applied by means of moistening a comb with them, and passing it through the hair, observing not to touch the skin with the dye.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

A Sovereign Remedy for Earache

November 10th, 2016

As soon as a child complains of earache, give it sufficient syrup of ipecac to vomit it freely. It will act like a charm, and the child will be asleep and free from the pain fifteen minutes afterwards. If a mother will only use this remedy she will save her child from a great deal of suffering, and herself from many sleepless nights. My plan is to give a teaspoonful of ipecac, after waiting ten or fifteen minutes (giving the child in the mean time plenty of water to drink,) if it then does not produce the desired effect, give another spoonful, this last will usually be sufficient.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

The Best Way To Wash Hair

September 21st, 2016

Rub the white of an egg into the roots, making partings for the purpose. Some use yolks and white beaten together. Rub the head all over whilst the egg is about it. Wash well with soap and tepid water. When clean pour some water as warm as can be borne over the head, and immediately afterwards some water quite cold. A pint basin is a good medium for applying this douche. Fill it and empty on the back of the head, holding the face over a large basin. Wring the water out of the hair. Rub the scalp, till it glows, round and round with a rough towel. Roll up the hair next, and tie a towel round the wet head; after awhile take it off. The hair then is nearly dry, and the head warm. Brush the hair with a clean brush, and spread it out. Do not dress it till quite dry.

Source: Cassell’s Household Guide