Poultice for Burns and Frozen Flesh

February 27th, 2022

Indian-meal poultices, covered with young hyson tea, moistened with hot water, and laid over burns or frozen parts, as hot as can be borne, will relieve the pain in five minutes; and blisters, if they have not, will not arise. One poultice is usually sufficient.

Source: Our Knowledge Box, ed. G. Blackie

To Prevent a Blister on the Heel

December 29th, 2021

If shoes slip and cause blisters on the heels, rub paraffin on the stocking. In a short time the slipping will stop.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

Sinapisms

December 11th, 2021

The sinapism is a poultice made of vinegar instead of milk, and rendered warm and stimulating by the addition of mustard, horseradish, or garlic. The common sinapism is made of equal quantities of bread crumbs and mustard, a sufficient quantity of strong vinegar, and mixing all together into a poultice. When a sinapism is required to be more stimulating, a little bruised garlic may be added. Sinapisms are employed to recal the blood and spirits to a weak part, as in the case of palsy; they are also of service in deep-seated pains, as in the case of sciatica. When the gout seizes the head or stomach, they are applied to the feet to bring the disorder down, and are likewise applied to the soles of the feet in a low state of fever. They should not be suffered to lie on till they have raised blisters, but till the parts become red, and will continue so when pressed with the finger.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

To Prevent A Blister On The Heel

July 28th, 2021

If shoes slip and cause blisters on the heels, rub paraffin on the stocking. In a short time the slipping will stop.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

Burns

July 18th, 2021

In slight cases, the juice of onions, a little ink or brandy rubbed immediately on the part affected, will prevent blisters. The juice of burdock, mixed with an equal quantity of olive oil, will make a good ointment for the purpose, and the fresh leaves of that plant may also be applied as a kind of plaster. Houseleek used by itself, or mixed with cream, will afford quick relief in external inflammations. A little spirit of turpentine, or linseed oil, mixed with lime water, if kept constantly to the part will remove the pain. But warm vinegar and water, frequently applied with a woollen cloth, is most to be depended on in these cases.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Burns and Scalds

July 3rd, 2019

The great thing in treating these is to exclude air as quickly as possible from the wounded part. Oily substances are the most useful for the purpose. Carron oil (linseed oil and lime water in equal proportions) and carbolized oil (1 part of carbolic acid to 50 parts of olive oil) are among the best things to apply, and one or other of them should be kept in stock for emergencies. In their absence olive, linseed or castor oil, lard, vaseline, or cornflour will serve for an immediate application. It is better to use at once what is to hand than to waste time in searching for what might be more beneficial. On no account pull away clothing that sticks to the burn: soak it off with tepid water. Blisters are pricked before applying the dressing of strips of lint soaked in carron or carbolized oil, covered with a layer of cottonwool and held in place by bandages. Acid burns — Dust them over with whiting or powdered chalk to neutralize the acid; then wash in clean water and dress with oil. If no whiting, etc., be available, wash at once in water. Alkali burns — Neutralize alkali with vinegar; wash, and dress with oil. Severe burns cause a serious shock to the system, and a tendency to collapse, so the patient should be kept warm while the doctor is fetched.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Sunburn

October 14th, 2018

To prevent: Anoint exposed parts with cold cream, vaseline, or use toilet powder before going out.

Treatment: Never wash sunburn. Never open blisters.

Apply—

      1 part lime water, 3 parts olive oil, shaken together in a bottle.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer