For A Hoarseness

July 26th, 2021

Sweeten a 1/4 pint of hyssop water with sugar candy, and set it over the fire; when quite hot, stir in the yolk of an egg well beaten, and drink it off; this may be taken night and morning.– Or: put a new laid egg in as much lemon juice as will cover it: let it stand twenty-four hours, and the shell will be dissolved. Break the egg, then take away the skin. Beat it well together, add 2 oz. of brown sugar candy pounded, 1/4 pint of rum, a wine-glassful of salad oil, and beat all well together. A table-spoonful the first in the morning, and the last at night.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Astringent Mixture

July 24th, 2021

An astringent mixture, in case of dysentery, may be made of three ounces of cinnamon water, mixed with as much common water, an ounce and a half of spirituous cinnamon-water, and half an ounce of japonic confection. A spoonful or two of this mixture may be taken every four hours, after the necessary evacuations have been allowed, and where the dysentery has not been of long standing, interposing every second or third day a dose of rhubarb.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Chilblains

July 22nd, 2021

Make a liniment, of 1 oz. of palma oil, 1 oz. of expressed oil of mace, and 2 drachms of camphor.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

An Excellent Bitter

July 20th, 2021

Cut 1/2 oz. of gentian in thin slices into a stone jar, with the same quantity of fresh orange peel and sliced ginger. Pour over them 1 quart of boiling water, and let it stand ten hours. Strain it, add a gill of sherry, and bottle it. For a weak stomach, a wine-glassful the first thing in the morning will create an appetite.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Burns

July 18th, 2021

In slight cases, the juice of onions, a little ink or brandy rubbed immediately on the part affected, will prevent blisters. The juice of burdock, mixed with an equal quantity of olive oil, will make a good ointment for the purpose, and the fresh leaves of that plant may also be applied as a kind of plaster. Houseleek used by itself, or mixed with cream, will afford quick relief in external inflammations. A little spirit of turpentine, or linseed oil, mixed with lime water, if kept constantly to the part will remove the pain. But warm vinegar and water, frequently applied with a woollen cloth, is most to be depended on in these cases.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Sassafras Jelly

July 16th, 2021

Take the pith of sassafras boughs, break it in small pieces, and let it soak in cold water till the water becomes glutinous. It has the flavor of sassafras, and is much relished by the sick, and is also good nourishment.

Source: Miss Beecher’s Domestic Receipt Book, Catherine Beecher

For Insomnia

July 14th, 2021

A heaping bowl of bread and milk, seasoned with salt, and eaten just before retiring, is recommended as a sure cure for the worst case of insomnia.

Source: Fowler’s Household Helps, A.L. Fowler

Plaster for a Cough

July 12th, 2021

Beat together 1 oz. each, of bees-wax, white Burgundy pitch, and rosin, 1/4 oz. coarse turpentine, 1/2 oz. oil of mace; spread it on white leather, the shape of a heart; when it flies off, renew it, two or three times.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

A Remedy For A Common Cold

July 10th, 2021

3 grains compound extract of colocynth, and 3 grains of soap, in 2 pills, taken at going to bed. The following night, take 16 or 18 grains of compound powder of contrayerva, and 1/2 a pint vinegar whey.– Breakfast in bed the next morning.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

For Bruises, Cuts, or Wounds

July 8th, 2021

Keep in the house a bottle containing a mixture of 3/4 oz. of scented trefoil, of rum, and of sweet oil.– Or: have a bottle three parts full of brandy, fill it quite full with the white leaves of the flowers of the garden lily, and cork it close. Lay some of the leaves on the wound, and keep it wet with the liquor. The root of the same lily is used to make strong poultices.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett