Burns and Scalds

July 3rd, 2019

The great thing in treating these is to exclude air as quickly as possible from the wounded part. Oily substances are the most useful for the purpose. Carron oil (linseed oil and lime water in equal proportions) and carbolized oil (1 part of carbolic acid to 50 parts of olive oil) are among the best things to apply, and one or other of them should be kept in stock for emergencies. In their absence olive, linseed or castor oil, lard, vaseline, or cornflour will serve for an immediate application. It is better to use at once what is to hand than to waste time in searching for what might be more beneficial. On no account pull away clothing that sticks to the burn: soak it off with tepid water. Blisters are pricked before applying the dressing of strips of lint soaked in carron or carbolized oil, covered with a layer of cottonwool and held in place by bandages. Acid burns — Dust them over with whiting or powdered chalk to neutralize the acid; then wash in clean water and dress with oil. If no whiting, etc., be available, wash at once in water. Alkali burns — Neutralize alkali with vinegar; wash, and dress with oil. Severe burns cause a serious shock to the system, and a tendency to collapse, so the patient should be kept warm while the doctor is fetched.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Boils

February 27th, 2019

If on a part exposed to friction of the clothes — the neck for instance — a boil should be protected by a piece of boracic lint strapped on with plaster. The gathering and discharge of a boil is hastened and the pain relieved by frequent bathing with water as hot as can be borne with comfort, containing a little boracic powder, lysol, or other disinfectant. Apply with a pad of cottonwool, which should be thrown away after use. In some cases a poultice of linseed — not bread — may be helpful; but there is a danger of poultices spreading infection and causing a crop of subsidiary boils. Very large boils, among which may be included carbuncles, may require lancing by a doctor at an early stage to give an outlet for the pus. As a rule a boil of the ordinary kind should be allowed to “ripen” fully before it is pricked, as by that time a core will have formed, the removal of which will allow the wound to heal quickly. After discharge dress the place with boracic ointment or powder to prevent reinfection, and keep it clean. Since boils are the result of a bad state of the blood, a person troubled by a succession of them should endeavour to improve the blood by means of purgatives, if he be constipated, and by exercise; or by taking cod-liver oil, iron, and nutritious food if “run down.”

The following treatment is said to be very effective: smear a little vaseline upon a piece of lint, pour a little chloroform on it, apply quickly to the boil and bind in place. Change the dressing every hour or so.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser