Bruises

October 8th, 2019

The only treatment that does any good is to bathe the bruised part with cold water — the colder the better — to check the diffusion of blood through the tissues. The part should be kept as still as possible and not be rubbed. Applying a piece of raw meat to a black eye may not do any harm, but it certainly has no useful effect.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Eye Lotions

March 3rd, 2019
  1. Dissolve 100 grs of boric acid in 6 oz water.
  2. Add one teaspoonful Condy’s fluid to 10 oz water.
  3. Dissolve 30 grs alum and 10 grs sulphate of zinc in 10 oz water.
  4. Goulard water.
  5. Cold tea. Useful in cases of slight inflammation.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Chilblains

March 1st, 2019

Due to bad circulation in the parts affected — the hands, feet, and ears. A person addicted to chilblains should wear thick, warm underclothing on arms and legs, and avoid garters or anything which tends to check the circulation. As the blood comes very near the surface at the wrists, it will be less chilled before entering the hands if woollen wristlets be worn indoors in cold weather. Thick-soled boots, lined with cork “socks”, will help to prevent chilblains in the feet when standing about in cold, damp weather. Cold draughts round the feet indoors, and standing on cold flooring while dressing and undressing are productive of chilblains in the toes. Daily baths as cold as suits, followed by brisk rubbing, and plenty of exercise and good food, will do a great deal to keep chilblains at bay. If they appear, however, bathing in hot water, followed by squeezing of the swellings with the fingers and the application of camphorated oil, helps to stop the itching. Broken chilblains should be treated like chapped hands. In cases where the cracks are very feep care must be taken to prevent infection by dressing with boracic lint and powder like other open wounds.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Boils

February 27th, 2019

If on a part exposed to friction of the clothes — the neck for instance — a boil should be protected by a piece of boracic lint strapped on with plaster. The gathering and discharge of a boil is hastened and the pain relieved by frequent bathing with water as hot as can be borne with comfort, containing a little boracic powder, lysol, or other disinfectant. Apply with a pad of cottonwool, which should be thrown away after use. In some cases a poultice of linseed — not bread — may be helpful; but there is a danger of poultices spreading infection and causing a crop of subsidiary boils. Very large boils, among which may be included carbuncles, may require lancing by a doctor at an early stage to give an outlet for the pus. As a rule a boil of the ordinary kind should be allowed to “ripen” fully before it is pricked, as by that time a core will have formed, the removal of which will allow the wound to heal quickly. After discharge dress the place with boracic ointment or powder to prevent reinfection, and keep it clean. Since boils are the result of a bad state of the blood, a person troubled by a succession of them should endeavour to improve the blood by means of purgatives, if he be constipated, and by exercise; or by taking cod-liver oil, iron, and nutritious food if “run down.”

The following treatment is said to be very effective: smear a little vaseline upon a piece of lint, pour a little chloroform on it, apply quickly to the boil and bind in place. Change the dressing every hour or so.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Emetics

February 25th, 2019

To a tumblerful of lukewarm water add either (a) a tablespoonful of salt; or (b) a dessertspoonful of ipecacuanha wine; or (c) a dessertspoonful of mustard. Tickling the back of the throat with the fingers or a feather also has an emetic effect.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser