Chilblains

March 1st, 2019

Due to bad circulation in the parts affected — the hands, feet, and ears. A person addicted to chilblains should wear thick, warm underclothing on arms and legs, and avoid garters or anything which tends to check the circulation. As the blood comes very near the surface at the wrists, it will be less chilled before entering the hands if woollen wristlets be worn indoors in cold weather. Thick-soled boots, lined with cork “socks”, will help to prevent chilblains in the feet when standing about in cold, damp weather. Cold draughts round the feet indoors, and standing on cold flooring while dressing and undressing are productive of chilblains in the toes. Daily baths as cold as suits, followed by brisk rubbing, and plenty of exercise and good food, will do a great deal to keep chilblains at bay. If they appear, however, bathing in hot water, followed by squeezing of the swellings with the fingers and the application of camphorated oil, helps to stop the itching. Broken chilblains should be treated like chapped hands. In cases where the cracks are very feep care must be taken to prevent infection by dressing with boracic lint and powder like other open wounds.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Nails (Ingrowing)

February 7th, 2018

Scrape surface — a piece of glass is good for this purpose. Cut in V-shape. Pack absorbent cotton under affected side. Paint with iodine.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

For Ingrowing Toenail

May 23rd, 2015

Take one drachm of muriatic acid, one drachm of nitric acid, and one ounce of chloride of zinc. Apply one drop of this mixture to the affected part once a day. This gives instant relief to the pain caused by ingrowing toenail.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Corns

March 5th, 2015

Corns are of three kinds: callous spots, soft corns, and corns. Callous spots may be rubbed or pared down and rubbed with cocoa butter. Soft corns come between the toes and are very painful. Soak absorbent cotton in a little turpentine and put between the toes; or sprinkle the cotton with powdered alum. These corns are supposed to be due to moisture between the toes and are sometimes cured and often prevented by keeping absorbent cotton between the toes. Prevention saves a lot of suffering. “Just corns” are calloused spots with a hard center; pressure on this causes pain. Soaking in hot water, and shaving off as much of the hardened skin as can be removed with safety, affords relief. The little hard core should be taken out.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter