Hints In Regard To Health (Part I)

September 1st, 2018

It is plainly seen by an inquiring mind that, aside from the selection and preparation of food, there are many little things constantly arising in the experience of everyday life which, in their combined effect, are powerful agents in the formation (or prevention) of perfect health. A careful observance of these little occurrences, an inquiry into the philosophy attending them, lies within the province, and indeed should be considered among the highest duties, of every housekeeper.

  • That one should be cautious about entering a sick room in a state of perspiration, as the moment you become cool your pores absorb. Do not approach contagious diseases with an empty stomach, nor sit between the sick and the fire, because the heat attracts the vapor.
  • That the flavor of cod-liver oil may be changed to the delightful one of fresh oyster, if the patient will drink a large glass of water poured from a vessel in which nails have been allowed to rust.
  • That a bag of hot sand relieves neuralgia.
  • That warm borax water will remove dandruff.
  • That salt should be eaten with nuts to aid digestion.
  • That it rests you, in sewing, to change your position frequently.
  • That a little soda water will relieve sick headache caused by indigestion.
  • That a cupful of strong coffee will remove the odor of onions from the breath.
  • That well-ventilated bedrooms will prevent morning headaches and lassitude.
  • A cupful of hot water drank before meals will relieve nausea and dyspepsia.
  • That a fever patient can be made cool and comfortable by frequent sponging off with soda water.
  • That consumptive night-sweats may be arrested by sponging the body nightly in salt water.
  • That one in a faint should be laid flat on his back, then loosen his clothes and let him alone.
  • The best time to bathe is just before going to bed, as any danger of taking cold is thus avoided; and the complexion is improved by keeping warm for several hours after leaving the bath.
  • To beat the whites of eggs quickly add a pinch of salt. Salt cools, and cold eggs froth rapidly.
  • Hot, dry flannels, applied as hot as possible, for neuralgia.

(Continued in this post.)

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Nails (Ingrowing)

February 7th, 2018

Scrape surface — a piece of glass is good for this purpose. Cut in V-shape. Pack absorbent cotton under affected side. Paint with iodine.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Nail Care

November 25th, 2017

To give a fine color to the nails, the hands and fingers must be well lathered and washed with fine soap; then the nails must be rubbed with equal parts of cinnebar and emery, followed by oil of bitter almonds. To take white spots from the nails, melt equal parts of pitch and turpentine in a small cup; add to it vinegar and powdered sulphur. Rub this on the nails and the spots will soon disappear.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Finger Nail Powder, Old Tried Remedy for

June 4th, 2008

“Violet Talcum Powder 1/2 ounce
Pulverized Boric Acid 1/2 ounce
Powdered Starch 1/2 ounce
Tincture of Carmine 15 drops

If the nails become hard or brittle, immerse them in warm olive oil every
night or rub vaselin into them.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

After Receiving A Bruise On The Finger Nail

January 30th, 2008

plunge the finger into water as hot as can be borne. By doing so the nail is softened, and yields so as to accommodate itself to the blood poured out beneath it, and the pain is soon diminished. The finger may then be wrapped in a bread-and-water poultice. On the following, or on the third day, the blood has clotted; and separating into its clot and fluid parts, the pressure it makes on the sensitive skin under the nail may be relieved by scraping the nail with a penknife till it becomes so thin that the scraping causes pain. The thin nail left is very light, and the pressure is mitigated; but if the squeezed part of the nail be very black, and tender when touched, it is best, after scraping, to make a nick through the remaining nail over the black blood, and immediately the watery part gushes out, the pressure almost entirely ceases, and instantaneous relief is afforded, but it unfortunately rarely, if ever, prevents the nail from coming off.

Source: Home Notes, January 1895.

For Dropsy

January 4th, 2008

Put a quarter of a pound of cream of tartar, and a pound of new nails, in a stone jug, with half a gallon of water, let it stand three or four days, occasionally shaking it; take a table spoonful three times a day, on an empty stomach, and half an hour after each dose, take two spoonsful of mustard seed or scraped horse-radish. If the swelling abates, you may take the medicine less frequently, or omit every other day, but do not leave it off until you are entirely cured. After it has stood some time, it becomes stronger, when you may put in more water. This has been highly recommended for the dropsy.

Source: Domestic Cookery, Useful Receipts, and Hints to Young Housekeepers, Elizabeth E. Lea