Chilblains

March 1st, 2019

Due to bad circulation in the parts affected — the hands, feet, and ears. A person addicted to chilblains should wear thick, warm underclothing on arms and legs, and avoid garters or anything which tends to check the circulation. As the blood comes very near the surface at the wrists, it will be less chilled before entering the hands if woollen wristlets be worn indoors in cold weather. Thick-soled boots, lined with cork “socks”, will help to prevent chilblains in the feet when standing about in cold, damp weather. Cold draughts round the feet indoors, and standing on cold flooring while dressing and undressing are productive of chilblains in the toes. Daily baths as cold as suits, followed by brisk rubbing, and plenty of exercise and good food, will do a great deal to keep chilblains at bay. If they appear, however, bathing in hot water, followed by squeezing of the swellings with the fingers and the application of camphorated oil, helps to stop the itching. Broken chilblains should be treated like chapped hands. In cases where the cracks are very feep care must be taken to prevent infection by dressing with boracic lint and powder like other open wounds.

Source: The Complete Household Adviser

Chilblains

October 8th, 2018

Pour kerosene oil in a saucer, wring out a rag in it and with this wipe the affected parts several times each day. If awake in the night, do the same thing. Do not saturate the cloth and lay it upon the chilblains, as it might cause a blister. Wipe the feet with a dampened cloth and let them dry themselves.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

Chilblains

November 1st, 2017

Chilblains are the result of too rapid warming of cold parts, generally feet or fingers. Sometimes for years after being frost-bitten, exposure to severe cold will produce itching and burning, and perhaps swelling and ulcers.

Treatment:

Rub with turpentine or alcohol. The rubbing in itself is excellent. See doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

For Chilblains

August 27th, 2017

Dip the feet every night and morning in cold water, withdrawing them in a minute or two, and drying them by rubbing them very hard with a coarse towel. To put them immediately into a pail of brine brought from a pickle tub is another excellent remedy when feet are found to be frosted.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

Green Ointment

July 18th, 2017

Take two or three large handfuls of the fresh-gathered leaves of the Jamestown weed, (called Apple Peru in New England,) and pound it in a mortar till you have extracted the juice. Then put the juice into a tin sauce-pan, mixed with sufficient lard to make a thick salve. Stew them together ten or fifteen minutes, and then pour the mixture into gallipots and cover it closely. It is excellent to rub on chilblains, and other inflammatory external swellings, applying it several times a day.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

A Simple and Harmless Hair Dye

April 15th, 2017

“It is said that the water in which potatoes have been boiled with the skins on forms a speedy and harmless dye for the hair and eyebrows. The pareings of potatoes before cooking may be boiled by themselves, and the water strained off for use. To apply it the shoulders should be covered with cloths to protect the dress and a fine comb dipped in the water drawn through the hair, wetting it at each stroke, until the head is thoroughly soaked. Let the hair dry thoroughly before putting it up. If the result is not satisfactory the first time, repeat the wetting with a sponge, taking care not to discolor the skin of the brow and neck. No hesitation need be felt about trying this, for potato-water is a safe article used in the household in a variety of ways. It relieves chilblains if the feet are soaked in it while the water is hot, and is said to ease rheumatic gout.”

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Liniment for Chilblains

December 10th, 2016

Spirits of turpentine, three drachms; camphorated oil, nine drachms.

Mix for a liniment. For an adult four drachms of the former and eight of the latter may be used. If the child be young, or if the skin be tender, the camphorated oil may be used without the turpentine.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Chilblains

November 12th, 2016

Place red-hot coals in a vessel and throw upon them a handful of corn meal. Hold the feet in the dense smoke, renewing the coals and meal till the pain is relieved. This has been known to make very marked cures, when all other remedies have failed.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Chilblains

December 30th, 2015

We give a few household remedies for the cure of these disagreeable companions. 1. Take half an ounce of white wax, one ounce of ox-marrow, two ounces of lard; melt slowly over a fire in a pipkin, and mix them well together; then strain through a linen cloth. 2. Before going to bed spread the ointment on the parts affected, feet or hands, taking care to wrap them up well. 3. Lemon juice rubbed on the inflamed parts is said to stop the itching. 4. A sliced onion dipped in salt has the same effect, but is apt to make the feet tender. 5. When the chilblains are broken, a little warm vinegar, or tincture of myrrh, is an excellent thing to bathe the wound and keep it clean. 6. Another useful remedy is a bread poultice, at bedtime, and in the morning apply a little resin ointment spread on a piece of lint or old linen.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

Chilblains, To Cure

August 3rd, 2008

Mutton tallow and lard of each 3/4 lb; melt in an iron vessel and add hydrated oxide of iron 2 oz; stirring continually with an iron spoon, until the mass is of a uniform black colour; then let it cool and add Venice-turpentine 2 oz; and Armenian bole 1 oz; oil of bergamot 1 dram; rub up the bole with a little olive oil before putting it in.

Apply several times daily by putting it on lint or linen — heals the worst cases in a few days.

Source: Dr Chase’s Recipes, or Information for Everybody, A.W. Chase