Chills

December 21st, 2017

Use heat. Apply hot-water bags under arms, on thighs and at feet. Give hot foot bath, in which is 1 tbsp. mustard. Rub limbs toward body, to restore circulation. Give hot coffee or tea, or hot lemonade. Wrap in blankets and put to bed. Chills indicate oncoming illness — see doctor!

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Bruises or Contusions

November 9th, 2017

“Black and blue” spots from blow or fall or pinching, causing blood vessels to rupture under skin.

Apply at first:

  • Ice, or ice water; or
  • Alcohol and water, half and half; or
  • Witch hazel, or arnica; or
  • Vinegar diluted with water.

Afterward use hot applications. Gentle rubbing or massaging helps dispel the discoloration.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Chilblains

November 1st, 2017

Chilblains are the result of too rapid warming of cold parts, generally feet or fingers. Sometimes for years after being frost-bitten, exposure to severe cold will produce itching and burning, and perhaps swelling and ulcers.

Treatment:

Rub with turpentine or alcohol. The rubbing in itself is excellent. See doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Cramps in the Leg

August 17th, 2017

Sleep with hot water bag at the feet. A garter tied tightly around the leg often effects a cure. Quick, hard rubbing is best in sudden, painful attacks. Often it is essential to walk about the room to bring the circulation of blood to the feet again.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

Grandmother’s Universal Liniment

May 3rd, 2017

One pint of alcohol and as much camphor gum as can be dissolved in it, half an ounce of the oil of cedar, one-half ounce of the oil of sassafras, aqua ammonia half an ounce, and the same amount of the tincture of morphine. Shake well together and apply by the fire; the liniment must not be heated, or come in contact with the fire, but the rubbing to be done by the warmth of the fire.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette