Relief for Burns

November 1st, 2018

For a burn or scald apply kerosene. It will allay the pain almost instantly and quickly heal the injured parts.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

Scorched Clothes

May 12th, 2018

Scorched clothes are often discarded as hopeless, but if not much burned may be made all right by the use of onion juice. Bake the onion and squeeze out the juice. Mix it with an ounce of fuller’s earth, a litle shredded soap and a wine glass of vinegar. Heat the mixture till the soap is dissolved. Then wait till it is cold before applying. Rub it well over the scorched place and leave to dry, then put the garment in the regular washing.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

Virtues of Turpentine

February 11th, 2018

After a housekeeper fully realizes the worth of turpentine in the household, she is never willing to be without a supply of it.

1 — It gives quick relief to burns.

2 — It is an excellent application for corns.

3 — It is good for rheumatism and for sore-throats.

4 — It is the quickest remedy for convulsions or fits by applying to the back of the neck.

5 — It is a sure preventive against moths; by just dropping a trifle in the bottom of drawers, chests and wardrobes, it will render the garments secure from injury during the summer.

6 — It will keep ants and bugs from closets and storerooms by putting a few drops in the corners and shelves. It is sure destruction to bed-bugs and will effectually drive them away from their haunts, if thoroughly applied to all the joints of the bedstead in the spring cleaning time, and injures neither furniture nor clothing.

7 — A little in suds washing day lightens laundry labor.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

For Burns – Good

January 28th, 2018

In one pint of linseed oil mix as much lime water as it will cut.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

To Cure a Burn

January 14th, 2018

Steep tea leaves, and bind on cold.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

Remedy for a Burn

September 12th, 2017

After immediately applying sweet oil, scrape the inside of a raw potato, and lay some of it on the place, securing it with a rag. In a short time put on fresh potato, and repeat this application very frequently. It will give immediate ease, and draw out the fire. Of course, if the burn is bad, it is best to send for a physician.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

Balm of Gilead Oil

August 23rd, 2017

Put loosely into a bottle as many balm of Gilead flowers as will come up to a third part of its height; then nearly fill up the bottle with sweet oil, which should be of the best quality. Let it infuse (shaking it occasionally) for several days, and it will then be fit for use. It is considered a good remedy for bruises of the skin; also for cuts, burns, and scalds that are not very bad, and should be applied immediately,–by wetting a soft rag with it; renewing it frequently,

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

Burns

August 7th, 2017

Grated raw peeled potatoes spread on bandages and bound on a badly burned arm, shoulder and hand brought immediate relief to one of my children once when I was on a farm and could not get a doctor. I kept the bandages moist by binding fresh new, wet ones over the old ones until pain ceased but did not remove the dressing at all until wound was healed. It healed perfectly without leaving any scar. Do not know the merits of this remedy from a physician’s standpoint but it was used successfully in a bad hotel fire in a village where no physicians resided and the patients all recovered from severe burns and there were no scars left on their bodies.

Source: Civic League Cook Book

A Cure for Burns or Scalds

February 22nd, 2017

Thoroughly bruise a raw onion and a potato into a pulp, by scraping or beating them with a rolling-pin; mix this pulp with a good table-spoonful of salad oil, and apply it to the naked burn or scald; secure it on the part with a linen bandage.

Source: A Plain Cookery Book for the Working Classes, C.E. Francatelli

For a Burn

December 22nd, 2016

Make half a tumbler of strong lime water, let it set a few minutes; then strain the water through a thin muslin to the same quantity of linseed or sweet oil (neat’s or hog’s foot will answer); mix it well, and spread over the burn; wrap over linen cloths. Do not remove the cloth for several days; saturate it frequently with the lime and oil until the inflammation is subdued. Should the odor become offensive, apply cold poultices of the flour of slippery elm; spread over with pulverized charcoal. A plaster of lard and soot is also good for a burn. Heal with any simple salve — a very good one is made by stewing together heart leaves, white lily root, agrimony, a few leaves of the Jamestown weed, and sweet gum. When the strength of the herbs is extracted, strain the water; throw away leaves, etc.; add fresh unsalted butter, and simmer gently until the water has evaporated. Keep this on hand for common sores, in a close-covered box.

Source: Mrs Hill’s New Cook-Book