Good Hard Soap

September 2nd, 2017

Five pounds of grease, one quart and one cup of cold water, one can of potash, one heaping tablespoonful of borax, two tablespoonfuls of ammonia. Dissolve the potash in the water, then add the borax and ammonia and stir in the lukewarm grease slowly and continue to stir until it becomes as thick as thick honey; then pour into a pan to harden. When firm cut into cakes. Grease that is no longer fit to fry in is used for this soap. Strain it carefully that no particles of food are left in it. It makes no difference how brown the grease is, the soap will become white and float in water. It should be kept a month before using.

Source: The Golden Age Cook Book, H. L. Dwight

French Polish

June 6th, 2017

Take a quarter of an ounce of gum sandarac and a quarter of an ounce of gum mastic; pick the dirt and black lumps out very carefully, and pound them in a mortar quite fine; put them into a bottle, and add to them a quartern (old measure) of strong spirit of wine; cork it down and put it in a warm place; shake it frequently till the gum is entirely dissolved, which will be in about twenty-four hours.

Before using it, be careful to ascertain that no grease is on the furniture, as grease would prevent its receiving the polish. If the furniture has been previously cleaned with bees’-wax or oil, it must be got off by scraping, which is the best way, but difficult to those who do not perfectly understand it, because if you are not very careful, you may scratch the surface, and create more expense than a workman would charge to do it properly at first. Or it may be done by scouring well with sand and water, and afterward rubbed quite smooth with fine glass paper, being careful to do it with the grain of the wood. To apply the polish, you must have a piece of list or cloth twisted, and tied round quite tight, and left even at one end, which should be covered with a piece of fine linen cloth; then pour a little of the polish on the furniture, and rub it well all over till it is worked into the grain of the wood, and begins to look quite smooth; then take a soft fine cloth, or what is better, an old silk handkerchief, and keep rubbing lightly until the polish is complete, which will take two or three hours. It will greatly help the polish if it is done near a fire.

If it does not look so smooth and clear as it should, a little sweet oil rubbed lightly over, and cleaned off directly, will greatly heighten it. If any part of the furniture has carving about it, where it will be impossible to polish, it must be done with mastic varnish, and a camel’s hair brush, after the rest is finished.

When the polish begins to look dull, it may be recovered with a little spirit of wine.

Source: The Cook’s Oracle and Housekeeper’s Manual, W.M. Kitchener

To Wash Greasy Tin and Iron

March 2nd, 2017

Pour a few drops of ammonia into every greasy roasting-pan, first half-filling with warm water. A bottle of ammonia should always stand near the sink for such uses. Never allow dirty pots or pans to stand and dry; for it doubles the labor of washing. Pour in water, and use ammonia, and the work is half done.

Source: The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, H. Campbell

Soft Soap

February 28th, 2017

All mutton and ham fat should be melted and strained into a large stone pot. The practice of throwing lumps of fat into a pot, and waiting till there are several pounds before trying them out, is a disgusting one, as often such a receptacle is alive with maggots. Try out the fat, and strain as carefully as you would lard or beef drippings, and it is then always ready for use. If concentrated lye or potash, which comes in little tins, is used, directions will be found on the tins. Otherwise allow a pound of stone potash to every pound of grease. Twelve pounds of each will make a barrel of soft soap.

Crack the potash in small pieces. Put in a large kettle with two gallons of water, and boil till dissolved. Then add the grease, and, when melted, pour all into a tight barrel. Fill it up with boiling water, and for a week, stir daily for five or ten minutes. It will gradually become like jelly.

Source: The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, H. Campbell

To Cleanse Silks, Woolens, and Cottons

February 26th, 2017

Grate raw potatoes to a fine pulp in clean water, and pass the liquid matter through a coarse sieve into another vessel of water ; let the mixture stand still till the fine white particles of the potatoes settle to the bottom; then pour off the liquor from the sediment, and preserve it for use. The article to be cleaned should be laid upon a cloth on a table ; dip a clean sponge into the liquor, and apply it to the article to be cleaned, till the dirt is perfectly separated, then rinse it in clean water several times. Two middle size potatoes will be sufficient for a pint of water. Should there be any grease spots on the articles, they should be previously extracted.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Hair Dye

January 9th, 2017

Nitric acid, one part ; nitrate of silver, ten parts ; sap green, nine parts ; powdered gum arabic, two parts ; water, three hundred parts ; essence musii, one or two drops to each bottle. Mix. In all cases, first free the hair from grease, by soap and water. All hair dyes must be applied by means of moistening a comb with them, and passing it through the hair, observing not to touch the skin with the dye.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

To Remove Grease Spots

December 28th, 2016

Take the yolk of an egg, entirely free from the white, and with a soft brush apply it on the spot until the grease appears removed or dissolved. Wash off the egg with moderately warm water, and then rinse off the whole with clean cold water.

Another. Lay a quantity of Magnesia or French chalk on the grease spot, and apply to it a hot flatiron: repeat till it is all out.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Catarrh, Pure Lard for

July 18th, 2008

“Take a bit of pure lard size of a pea and draw it up each nostril every evening. It will require about a year of constant use.” The grease helps to keep the affected parts moist and relieves any congestion present. Anyone suffering with this disease should make it a point to use grease in some form every night. It gives great relief.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Snake Bites, Simple Poultice for

June 8th, 2008

Poultice of hops or salt and grease; grease is to keep salt together. Hops are always kept to be used in berry season.” As a poultice it draws the poison out.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Choking, Grease and Meat Common Remedy for

April 17th, 2008

“Warm lard, or any kind of grease, and give the patient. Have seen it used with success.” The warm grease will usually cause vomiting, and in that way remove the foreign matter.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter