Washes

January 4th, 2022

An infusion of horseradish in milk, makes one of the safest and best washes for the skin; or the fresh juice of houseleek, mixed with an equal quantity of new milk or cream. Honey water made rather thick, so as to form a kind of varnish on the skin, is a useful application in frosty weather, when the skin is liable to be chipped; and if it occasions any irritation or uneasiness, a little fine flour or pure hair powder should be dusted on the hands or face. A more elegant wash may be made of four ounces of potash, four ounces of rose water, and two of lemon juice, mixed in two quarts of water. A spoonful or two of this mixture put into the basin, will scent and soften the water intended to be used.

Source: The Cook And Housekeeper’s Complete and Universal Dictionary, Mary Eaton

Itch, Lotions For

November 25th, 2021

Hydriodate of potash, two drams; distilled water, eight ounces. Apply frequently.

Equal parts of lime-water and linseed oil will also allay the irritation.

Or, after washing the body in warm water, apply the following : — Lime, two ounces ; sulphur-vivum, two ounces. Mix. Pour off the clear liquid for use.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Wasps and Bees, Stings From

September 10th, 2021

Mix together a little spirits of hartshorn with double its quantity of olive oil, and apply to the part affected.

Another very simple remedy, which is asserted to be unfailing, is to rub with an onion the part of the flesh which is stung.

The application of either oil of tartar or a solution of potash will give instant ease.

Perhaps the most convenient thing will be to mix a little oil with common soda. This will allay both the pain and the irritation.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Itch, Remedy For

May 25th, 2021

Flowers of brimstone, two ounces; carbonate of potash, two drams; lard, four ounces. Mix, and add two or three drops of essence of lemon. Should the brimstone be considered unpleasant, use in its stead two ounces of white hellebore powder. To be rubbed into the body.

Source: Recipes for the Million

Wash for the Skin

February 21st, 2021

An infusion of horse-radish in milk, or the fresh juice of house leek, are both good.

Honey water, very thick, is good in frosty weather.

Also, a wash made of 4 oz. potash, 4 oz. rose water, and 2 oz. lemon juice, mixed with 2 quarts of water; pour 2 table-spoonsful in a bason of water.

Source: The English Housekeeper, Anne Cobbett

Beer, Restoration of Spoiled

October 16th, 2018

I.—Powdered chalk is poured into the cask and allowed to remain in the beer until completely precipitated.

II.—The liquor of boiled raisins may be poured into the beer, with the result that the sour taste of the beer is disguised.

III.—A small quantity of a solution of potash will remove the sour taste of beer. Too much potash must not be added; otherwise the stomach will suffer. Beer thus restored will not keep long.

IV.—If the beer is not completely spoiled it may be restored by the addition of coarsely powdered charcoal.

V.—If the addition of any of the above-mentioned substances should affect the taste of the beer, a little powdered zingiber may be used to advantage. Syrup or molasses may also be employed.

Source: Henley’s Twentieth Century Formulas, Recipes and Processes

Good Hard Soap

September 2nd, 2017

Five pounds of grease, one quart and one cup of cold water, one can of potash, one heaping tablespoonful of borax, two tablespoonfuls of ammonia. Dissolve the potash in the water, then add the borax and ammonia and stir in the lukewarm grease slowly and continue to stir until it becomes as thick as thick honey; then pour into a pan to harden. When firm cut into cakes. Grease that is no longer fit to fry in is used for this soap. Strain it carefully that no particles of food are left in it. It makes no difference how brown the grease is, the soap will become white and float in water. It should be kept a month before using.

Source: The Golden Age Cook Book, H. L. Dwight

To Keep out Mosquitoes and Bats

June 24th, 2017

If a bottle of the oil of pennyroyal is left uncorked in a room at night, not a mosquito, nor any other blood-sucker, will be found there in the morning. Mix potash with powdered meal, and throw it into the rat-holes of a cellar, and the rats will depart. If a rat or a mouse get into your pantry, stuff into its hole a rag saturated with a solution of cayenne pepper, and no rat or mouse will touch the rag for the purpose of opening communication with a depot of supplies.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Soft Soap

February 28th, 2017

All mutton and ham fat should be melted and strained into a large stone pot. The practice of throwing lumps of fat into a pot, and waiting till there are several pounds before trying them out, is a disgusting one, as often such a receptacle is alive with maggots. Try out the fat, and strain as carefully as you would lard or beef drippings, and it is then always ready for use. If concentrated lye or potash, which comes in little tins, is used, directions will be found on the tins. Otherwise allow a pound of stone potash to every pound of grease. Twelve pounds of each will make a barrel of soft soap.

Crack the potash in small pieces. Put in a large kettle with two gallons of water, and boil till dissolved. Then add the grease, and, when melted, pour all into a tight barrel. Fill it up with boiling water, and for a week, stir daily for five or ten minutes. It will gradually become like jelly.

Source: The Easiest Way in Housekeeping and Cooking, H. Campbell

To Eradicate Corns

January 17th, 2017

Bathe the corn in warm water, with a sponge, on going to bed, until it has become tender ; then wet the corn with a bit of slackened potash, or some caustic of potash, or with a very strong ley. Repeat two or three times.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott