Broth for Sick and Convalescent Persons

July 24th, 2017

Put a Crag-end of a Neck of Mutton, a Knuckle of Veal, and a Pullet into a Pipkin of water, with a spoonful or two of French-barley first scalded in a water or two. The Pullet is put in after the other meat is well skimmed, and hath boiled an hour. A good hour after that, put in a large quantity of Sorrel, Lettice, Purslane, Borage and Bugloss, and boil an hour more at least three hours in all. Before you put in the herbs, season the broth with Salt, a little Pepper and Cloves, strain out the broth and drink it.

But for Potage, put at first a good piece of fleshy young Beef with the rest of the meat. And put not in your herbs till half an hour before you take off the Pot. When you use not herbs, but Carrots and Turneps, put in a little Peny-royal and a sprig of Thyme. Vary in the season with Green-pease, or Cucumber quartered longwise, or Green sower Verjuyce Grapes; always well-seasoned with Pepper and Salt and Cloves. You pour some of the broth upon the sliced-bread by little and little, stewing it, before you put the Herbs upon the Potage.

The best way of ordering your bread in Potages, is thus. Take light spungy fine white French-bread, cut only the crusts into tosts. Tost them exceeding dry before the fire, so that they be yellow. Then put them hot into a hot dish, and pour upon them some very good strong broth, boiling hot. Cover this, and let them stew together gently, not boil; and feed it with fresh-broth, still as it needeth; This will make the bread swell much, and become like gelly.

Source: The Closet Of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened, K. Digby

Swaim’s Vermifuge

April 19th, 2017

Worm seed, two ounces; valerian, rhubarb, pink root, white agaric, senna, of each one ounce and a half. Boil in sufficient water to yield three quarts of decoction. Now add to it ten drops of the oil of tansy and forty-five drops of the oil of cloves, dissolved in a quart of rectified spirit. Dose: one tablespoonful at night.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Blackberry Diarrhoea Syrup

January 11th, 2017

To two quarts of blackberries, add one pound of loaf sugar, half an ounce of nutmegs, half an ounce of ground cinnamon, half an ounce of ground cloves, quarter an ounce ground alspice. Boil the whole together, and when cold add a pint of fourth proof brandy. From a tea-spoonful to a wine-glassful, according to the age of the patient, till relieved. In 1832 this was very successful in cases of the cholera.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

Blackberry Cordial

July 31st, 2016

To two quarts of juice add one pound of sugar, one-half ounce of cloves, one-half ounce of cinnamon, one-half ounce of nutmeg. Boil twenty minutes, and when cold add one pint good brandy. This is splendid in cases of dysentery.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Restorative Jelly

June 7th, 2016

One-half box gelatine, 1 cup port wine, 1 tablespoon of powdered gum arabic, 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, 3 tablespoons of sugar, 2 cloves. Put all together in a glass jar, and cover closely. Place the jar on a trivet in a kettle of cold water. Heat it slowly and when the mixture is dissolved, stir well and strain. Pour into a shallow dish, and when cool cut it into small squares. This is good for an old person or a very weak patient.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

Mulled Wine

May 16th, 2016

Take a quarter of an ounce of bruised cinnamon, half a nutmeg, (grated), and ten bruised cloves ; infuse them in half a pint of boiling water for an hour, strain, and add half an ounce of white sugar. Pour the whole into a pint of hot port or sherry wine. This is a good cordial and restorative in the low stages of fever, or in the debility of convalescence from fevers.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Blackberry Syrup

February 18th, 2016

Half a pound of blackberry root, and one-half pound of white oak bark, cut into small pieces or pulverized, and boiled in one gallon of water until it is reduced to two quarts, then strain, and boil up with cloves, cinnamon and pepper, and enough sugar to make a thick syrup. Add one gill best French brandy to each quart. Bottle and seal with wax, when it will keep for years. This was used most successfully during the late war, in cases of dysentery.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Wash to Perfume the Breath

January 15th, 2016

Cloves, bruised in a mortar, three teaspoonfuls; boiling water, one pint. Infuse for an hour in a covered vessel — exactly as in making tea — when cold, decant, or filter through coarse muslin. Wash the mouth with it as often as may seem necessary.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

To make Syrup of Turneps for a Consumption

January 9th, 2016

Take half a peck of Turneps washed and pared clean, cut them thin, put to them one pound of Raisins of the Sun stoned, one quarter of a pound of Figs cut small, one Ounce of Anniseeds bruised, half an Ounce of Licoras sliced, one Ounce of Cloves bruised, two handfuls of Burrage Flowers, and so much water as will cover all, and two fingers breadth above them, then boil it on a great fire in an earthen Vessel covered, untill the roots be soft and tender, then strain out the Liquor, and to every Pint of it put a pound of fine Sugar, the whites of two Eggs beaten, boil it to a Syrrop, and use it often, two or three spoonfuls at a time.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

A very good Surfet water

January 3rd, 2016

Take what quantity of Brandy you please, steep a good quantity of the Flowers of Red Poppies therein, which grow amongst the Wheat, having the black bottoms cut off, when they have been steeped long enough, strain them out, and put in new, and so do till the Brandy be very red with them, and let it stand in the Sun all the while they infuse, then put in Nutmegs, Cloves, Ginger and Cinamon, with some fine Sugar, so much as you think fit, and keep it close stopped; this is very good for Surfets, Wind in the Stomach, or any Illness whatever.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley