Hints In Regard To Health (Part II)

September 3rd, 2018

(Continued from this post.)

  • Sprains and bruises call for an application of the tincture of arnica.
  • If an artery is severed, tie a small cord or handkerchief above it.
  • For bilious colic, soda and ginger in hot water. It may be taken freely.
  • Tickling in the throat is best relieved by a gargling of salt and water.
  • Pains in the side are most promptly relieved by the application of mustard.
  • For cold in the head nothing is better than powdered borax, sniffed up the nostrils.
  • A drink of hot, strong lemonade before going to bed will often break up a cold and cure a sore throat.
  • Nervous spasms are usually relieved by a little salt taken into the mouth and allowed to dissolve.
  • Whooping cough paroxysms are relieved by breathing the fumes of turpentine and carbolic acid.
  • Broken limbs should be placed in natural positions, and the patient kept quiet until the surgeon arrives.
  • Hemorrhages of the lungs or stomach are promptly checked by small doses of salt. The patient should be kept as quiet as possible.
  • Sleeplessness, caused by too much blood in the head may be overcome by applying a cloth wet with cold water to the back of the neck.
  • Wind colic is promptly relieved by peppermint essence taken in a little warm water. For small children it may be sweetened. Paregoric is also good.
  • For stomach cramps, ginger ale or a teaspoonful of the tincture of ginger in a half glass of water in which a half teaspoonful of soda has been dissolved.
  • Sickness of the stomach is most promptly relieved by drinking a teacupful of hot soda and water. If it brings the offending matter up, all the better.
  • A teaspoonful of ground mustard in a cupful of warm water is a prompt and reliable emetic, and should be resorted to in cases of poisoning or cramps in the stomach from over-eating.
  • Avoid purgatives or strong physic, as they not only do no good, but are positively hurtful. Pills may relieve for the time, but they seldom cure.
  • Powdered resin is the best thing to stop bleeding from cuts. After the powder is sprinkled on, wrap the wound with soft cotton cloth. As soon as the wound begins to feel feverish, keep the cloth wet with cold water.
  • Hot water is better than cold for bruises. It relieves pain quickly, and by preventing congestion often keeps off the ugly black and blue mark. “Children cry for it,” when they experience the relief it affords their bumps and bruises.
  • For a sprained ankle, the whites of eggs and powdered alum made into a plaster is almost a specific.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Nosebleed

February 3rd, 2018

Head in upright position. Raise arm on bleeding side. Loosen collar. Apply ice in a cloth to bridge of nose and back of neck. A roll of paper under upper lip. Snuff cold tea up nose, or salt water, 1 tsp. to cup water, or the same of powdered alum.

If bleeding continues, tie a small wad of cotton with thread; dip it into peroxide of hydrogen, and plug nostril by pushing the cotton gently with a pencil. The thread is used to withdraw cotton.

If these means fail, send for doctor.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

Bleeding of Gums

December 9th, 2017

Rinse mouth with alum water — 1 teaspoon powdered alum in a glass of ice water; or 1 tsp. tincture of myrrh in 1 tbsp. water.

Source: The Mary Frances First Aid Book, Jane Eayre Fryer

To Stop Blood

July 30th, 2017

For a prick with a pin, or a slight cut, nothing will more effectually stop the bleeding than old cobwebs compressed into a lump and applied to the wound, or bound on it with a rag. A scrap of cotton wadding is also good for stopping blood.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

To Make Leeches Take Hold

December 4th, 2016

To make leeches take hold on the spot required, take a piece of white paper, cut small holes in it where you wish them to bite, lay this over the place, and put the leeches on the paper. Not liking the paper, they will take hold of the skin where it appears through the hole.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

To Stop The Flow Of Blood

September 23rd, 2016

For a slight cut there is nothing better to control the hemorrhage than common unglazed brown wrapping paper, such as is used by marketmen and grocers; a piece to be bound over the wound. A handful
of flour bound on the cut. Cobwebs and brown sugar, pressed on like lint. When the blood ceases to flow, apply arnica or laudanum.

When an artery is cut the red blood spurts out at each pulsation. Press the thumb firmly over the artery near the wound, and on the side toward the heart. Press hard enough to stop the bleeding, and wait till a physician comes. The wounded person is often able to do this himself, if he has the requisite knowledge.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Bleeding at the Nose

September 7th, 2016

Roll up a piece of paper and press it under the upper lip. In obstinate cases, blow a little gum arabic up the nostril through a quill, which will immediately stop the discharge; powdered alum, dissolved in water, is also good. Pressure by the finger over the small artery near the ala (wing) of the nose on the side where the blood is flowing, is said to arrest the hemorrhage immediately. Sometimes by wringing a cloth out of very hot water and laying it on the back of the neck, gives relief. Napkins wrung out of cold water must be laid across the forehead and nose, the hands dipped in cold water, and a bottle of hot water applied to the feet.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

In Cases of Serious Hemorrhage after Tooth-Extraction

April 24th, 2016

The plugging of the cavity with wool soaked in turpentine is at once rapid and effectual.

Source: Audel’s Household Helps, Hints and Receipts

To Stop the Flow of Blood

February 14th, 2016

Bathe the cut with ordinary red wine; then cover the wound with either whiting, pipe-clay, or cobwebs and brown sugar ; if you have none of these, apply the fine dust of tea, or, if all are
wanting, a handful of earth held tightly to the wound until help can be obtained ; if the cut is deep, it is wise not only to bandage it tightly, but to tie another bandage above, not onto, the wound.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Bleeding at the Lungs

April 20th, 2015

Eat freely of raw table salt, or take a teaspoonful three or four times a day of equal parts of powdered loaf sugar and rosin, or boil an ounce of dried yellow dock root in a pint of milk. Take a cupful two or three times a day.

Source: The Ladies’ Book of Useful Information