To Prevent Mold on Top of Glasses of Jelly

April 3rd, 2017

Melt paraffine and pour over the jelly after it is cold. No brandy, paper, or other covering is necessary.

Source: Things Mother Used To Make, L.M. Gurney

Method of cleaning Paper-Hangings

March 16th, 2017

Cut into eight half quarters a quartern loaf, two days old; it must neither be newer nor staler. With one of these pieces, after having blown off all the dust from the paper to be cleaned, by the means of a good pair of bellows, begin at the top of the room, holding the crust in the hand, and wiping lightly downward with the crumb, about half a yard at each stroke, till the upper part of the hangings is completely cleaned all round. Then go round again, with the like sweeping stroke downwards, always commencing each successive course a little higher than the upper stroke had extended, till the bottom be finished. This operation, if carefully performed, will frequently make very old paper look almost equal to new.

Great caution must be used not by any means to rub the paper hard, nor to attempt cleaning it the cross, or horizontal way. The dirty part of the bread, too, must be each time cut away, and the pieces renewed as soon as it may become necessary.

Source: The Cook’s Oracle and Housekeeper’s Manual, W.M. Kitchener

To Make Leeches Take Hold

December 4th, 2016

To make leeches take hold on the spot required, take a piece of white paper, cut small holes in it where you wish them to bite, lay this over the place, and put the leeches on the paper. Not liking the paper, they will take hold of the skin where it appears through the hole.

Source: Valuable Receipts, J.M. Prescott

To Prevent Mold on the Top of Glasses of Jelly

October 27th, 2016

Lay a lump of paraffine on the top of the hot jelly, letting it melt and spread over it. No brandy paper and no other covering is necessary. If preferred the paraffine can be melted and poured over after the jelly is cold.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

To Stop The Flow Of Blood

September 23rd, 2016

For a slight cut there is nothing better to control the hemorrhage than common unglazed brown wrapping paper, such as is used by marketmen and grocers; a piece to be bound over the wound. A handful
of flour bound on the cut. Cobwebs and brown sugar, pressed on like lint. When the blood ceases to flow, apply arnica or laudanum.

When an artery is cut the red blood spurts out at each pulsation. Press the thumb firmly over the artery near the wound, and on the side toward the heart. Press hard enough to stop the bleeding, and wait till a physician comes. The wounded person is often able to do this himself, if he has the requisite knowledge.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette