Broth for Sick and Convalescent Persons

July 24th, 2017

Put a Crag-end of a Neck of Mutton, a Knuckle of Veal, and a Pullet into a Pipkin of water, with a spoonful or two of French-barley first scalded in a water or two. The Pullet is put in after the other meat is well skimmed, and hath boiled an hour. A good hour after that, put in a large quantity of Sorrel, Lettice, Purslane, Borage and Bugloss, and boil an hour more at least three hours in all. Before you put in the herbs, season the broth with Salt, a little Pepper and Cloves, strain out the broth and drink it.

But for Potage, put at first a good piece of fleshy young Beef with the rest of the meat. And put not in your herbs till half an hour before you take off the Pot. When you use not herbs, but Carrots and Turneps, put in a little Peny-royal and a sprig of Thyme. Vary in the season with Green-pease, or Cucumber quartered longwise, or Green sower Verjuyce Grapes; always well-seasoned with Pepper and Salt and Cloves. You pour some of the broth upon the sliced-bread by little and little, stewing it, before you put the Herbs upon the Potage.

The best way of ordering your bread in Potages, is thus. Take light spungy fine white French-bread, cut only the crusts into tosts. Tost them exceeding dry before the fire, so that they be yellow. Then put them hot into a hot dish, and pour upon them some very good strong broth, boiling hot. Cover this, and let them stew together gently, not boil; and feed it with fresh-broth, still as it needeth; This will make the bread swell much, and become like gelly.

Source: The Closet Of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened, K. Digby

To Prevent Mold on Top of Glasses of Jelly

April 3rd, 2017

Melt paraffine and pour over the jelly after it is cold. No brandy, paper, or other covering is necessary.

Source: Things Mother Used To Make, L.M. Gurney

Baked Lemon for a Cold

February 4th, 2017

Dose a teaspoonful. Bake a lemon till soft, take out all the inside, and mix with as much sugar as it will hold, strain and stand till cold when it will jelly.

Source: My Pet Recipes, Tried And True

To Prevent Mold on the Top of Glasses of Jelly

October 27th, 2016

Lay a lump of paraffine on the top of the hot jelly, letting it melt and spread over it. No brandy paper and no other covering is necessary. If preferred the paraffine can be melted and poured over after the jelly is cold.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Restorative Jelly

June 7th, 2016

One-half box gelatine, 1 cup port wine, 1 tablespoon of powdered gum arabic, 2 tablespoons of lemon juice, 3 tablespoons of sugar, 2 cloves. Put all together in a glass jar, and cover closely. Place the jar on a trivet in a kettle of cold water. Heat it slowly and when the mixture is dissolved, stir well and strain. Pour into a shallow dish, and when cool cut it into small squares. This is good for an old person or a very weak patient.

Source: Tested Recipe Cook Book, Mrs H.L. Wilson

Rice Jelly

February 22nd, 2016

(excellent for children with weak bowels.) Half a cupful of whole rice, well washed, and soaked two hours in a little warm water ; then add to the rice and water in the kettle three pints of cold water ; one small pinch of salt put in the cold water ; sweeten to taste with rock candy when strained ; strain through double tarlatan.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Arrowroot Wine Jelly

November 12th, 2015

One cupful of boiling water, one scant tablespoonful of arrowroot, mixed with a little cold water, one tablespoonful of sugar, a pinch of salt, one tablespoonful of brandy, or three tablespoonfuls of wine. Excellent for a sick person without fever.

Source: The White House Cookbook, F.L. Gillette

Moss Jelly

October 21st, 2015

Steep Carragua, or Irish moss, in cold water a few minutes, to extract the bitter taste–then drain off the water, and to half an ounce of moss put a quart of fresh water, and a stick of cinnamon. Boil it till it becomes a thick jelly, then strain it, and season it to the taste with white wine and white sugar. This is very nourishing, and recommended highly for consumptive complaints.

Source: The American Housewife

Dysentery, Herb Remedy for

January 26th, 2008

“Take four ounces poplar bark, four ounces bayberry bark and three ounces tormentil root, simmer gently in four quarts of water, down to three, strain and add two pounds granulated sugar; let it come to boiling point, skim and add one-half pound blackberry or peach jelly and one-half pint best brandy. Keep in a cool place, take one-half wineglassful three or four times a day or more often if required.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter