Indian Cough Cure

April 18th, 2018

To five cents’ worth of whole flaxseed add three pints of water. Boil fifteen or twenty minutes, strain and add the juice of three lemons, one-half pound of rock candy and one ounce glycerine. Take wine-glass of this three or four times a day and before retiring. It will cure the worst cough in three days.

Source: 1001 Household Hints, Ottilie V. Ames

Pectorals for a Colde or Consumption

March 7th, 2018

Take one pound of brown Sugar Candy, one Ounce of Juice of Lycorisse, dissolve ye lycorisse in 3 spoonfulls of Hysop water, put to these a drachm of Orrice a drachm of Enul-campane, halfe a drachm of Gum dragon being all made into fine powder, muske a graine then take a drachm of oyle of Anniseeds, worke it well together with your hand and make it up into pectorals of what bigness you please, lay them on a dish to dry before ye fire or in an oven after drawn bread, and keep them dry.

Source: A Book of Simples, H.W. Lewer

Conserve of Red Roses

August 13th, 2017

Doctor Glisson makes his conserve of red Roses thus: Boil gently a pound of red Rose leaves (well picked, and the Nails cut off) in about a pint and a half (or a little more, as by discretion you shall judge fit, after having done it once; The Doctors Apothecary takes two pints) of Spring water; till the water have drawn out all the Tincture of the Roses into it self, and that the leaves be very tender, and look pale like Linnen; which may be in a good half hour, or an hour, keeping the pot covered whiles it boileth. Then pour the tincted Liquor from the pale Leaves (strain it out, pressing it gently, so that you may have Liquor enough to dissolve your Sugar) and set it upon the fire by it self to boil, putting into it a pound of pure double refined Sugar in small Powder; which as soon as it is dissolved, put in a second pound; then a third, lastly a fourth, so that you have four pound of Sugar to every pound of Rose-leaves. (The Apothecary useth to put all the four pounds into the Liquor altogether at once,) Boil these four pounds of Sugar with the tincted Liquor, till it be a high Syrup, very near a candy height, (as high as it can be, not to flake or candy) Then put the pale Rose-leaves, into this high Syrup, as it yet standeth upon the fire, or immediately upon the taking it off the fire. But presently take it from the fire, and stir them exceeding well together, to mix them uniformly; then let them stand till they be cold; then pot them up. If you put up your Conserve into pots, whiles it is yet throughly warm, and leave them uncovered some days, putting them in the hot Sun or stove, there will grow a fine candy upon the top, which will preserve the conserve without paper upon it, from moulding, till you break the candied crust, to take out some of the conserve.

The colour both of the Rose-leaves and the Syrup about them, will be exceeding beautiful and red, and the taste excellent; and the whole very tender and smoothing, and easie to digest in the stomack without clogging it, as doth the ordinary rough conserve made of raw Roses beaten with Sugar, which is very rough in the throat. The worst of it is, that if you put not a Paper to lie always close upon the top of the conserve, it will be apt to grow mouldy there on the top; especially aprés que le pot est entamé.

The Conserve of Roses, besides being good for Colds and Coughs, and for the Lunges, is exceeding good for sharpness and heat of Urine, and soreness of the bladder, eaten much by it self, or drunk with Milk, or distilled water of Mallows, and Plantaine, or of Milk.

Source: The Closet Of Sir Kenelm Digby Knight Opened, K. Digby

Flax-Seed Lemonade

July 16th, 2017

To a large table-spoonful of flax-seed allow a tumbler and a half of cold water. Boil them together till the liquid becomes very sticky. Then strain it hot over a quarter of a pound of pulverized sugar candy, and an ounce of pulverized gum arabic. Stir it till quite dissolved, and squeeze into it the juice of a lemon.

This mixture has frequently been found an efficacious remedy for a cold; taking a wine-glass of it as often as the cough is troublesome.

Source: Directions for Cookery, in its Various Branches, Eliza Leslie

Remedy for a Cough

December 20th, 2016

Five cents worth of rock candy, five cents worth of gum arabic, five cents worth of licorice, all dissolved in a pint of water over a slow fire. When cold add five cents worth of paregoric, and five cents worth of syrup of ipecac; bottle and take a teaspoonful several times a day.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

To Remove Sunburn

October 1st, 2016

Take two drachms of borax, one drachm of Roman alum, one drachm of camphor, half an ounce of sugar-candy, and a pound of ox-gall. Mix and stir well for ten minutes, and stir it in the same way three or four times a day for a fortnight. When clear and transparent strain through blotting-paper, and bottle for use.

Source: Cassell’s Household Guide

Cough Mixture

July 11th, 2016

Two quarts of rain water, one pound of raisins, five cents worth of licorice, a fourth of a pound of rock candy. Boil this to one quart and strain it. Take two tablespoons three times daily; adding
a little vinegar.

Source: 76: A Cook Book

To make a rare Medicine for the Chine-Cough

June 3rd, 2016

Make a Syrrop of Hysop-water and white Sugar Candy, then take the Powder of Gum Dragon, and as much of white Sugar Candy mixed together, and eat of it several times of the day, or take the above-named Syrrop, either of them will do the Cure.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

Alkaline Drink (good in cases of inflammation)

April 4th, 2016

The thin rind of a lemon ; one tablespoonful of powdered rock candy; enough boiling water to dissolve the sugar; half a pint of Vichy water, and half a pint of common water.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington

Rice Jelly

February 22nd, 2016

(excellent for children with weak bowels.) Half a cupful of whole rice, well washed, and soaked two hours in a little warm water ; then add to the rice and water in the kettle three pints of cold water ; one small pinch of salt put in the cold water ; sweeten to taste with rock candy when strained ; strain through double tarlatan.

Source: The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper’s Guide, Mrs Washington