For Sore Throat

April 8th, 2016

Take a small quantity of chlorate potassa, pour boiling water on it, and let it stand until it takes up all it will, then add old rye whisky equal to the amount of water you used. Add to this tincture of capsicum until the mixture is pretty sharp, and then it is ready for use. This is good for a gargle in all cases of sore throat and is an excellent remedy for diphtheria, using it both as a gargle and internally. Dose:— One teaspoonful every hour, or when very bad every half hour. Water will only dissolve a certain quantity of potassa. A good rule, is to take a half a pint of water, and when it has absorbed all the potassa it will, pour the water off and add a half a pint of whisky. The capsicum is harmless so there is no danger of getting too much in, but to this quantity I should say add about two tablespoonfuls, which will make it sufficiently hot.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Remedy for Diptheria

January 27th, 2016

Chlorate of potassa is a well known means of arresting the progress of diphtheria. A solution should be kept in every family medicine chest, ready to be administered in every suspicious case of
sore throat. The solution is made by dissolving half an ounce of the chlorate in a pint of boiling water. It should be preserved in a bottle, closely corked, and when used the bottle should be shaken with sufficient violence to diffuse the crystalline sediments through the water. The dose is a tablespoonful thrice daily.

Source: The Housekeeper’s Friend: A Practical Cookbook

Freckles

March 13th, 2015

Freckles, or the round or oval-shaped yellowish or brownish-yellow spots, resembling stains, common on the face and the backs of the hands of persons with a fair and delicate skin who are much exposed to the direct rays of the sun in hot weather, are of little importance in themselves, and have nothing to do with the general health. Ladies who desire to remove them may have recourse to the frequent application of dilute spirit, or lemon juice, or a lotion formed by adding acetic, hydrochloric, nitric, or sulphuric acid, or liquor of potassa, to water, until it is just strong enough to slightly prick the tongue. One part of good Jamaica rum to two parts of lemon juice or weak vinegar is a good form of lotion for the purpose. The effect of all these lotions is increased by the addition of a little glycerine.

The preceding are also occasionally called “common freckles,” “summer freckles,” and “sun freckles.” In some cases they are very persistent, and resist all attempts to remove them while the exposure that produces them is continued. Their appearance may be prevented by the greater use of the veil, parasol or sunshade, or avoidance of exposure to the sun during the heat of the day.

Another variety, popularly known as cold freckles, occur at all seasons of the year, and usually depend on disordered health or some disturbance of the natural functions of the skin. Here the only external application that proves useful is the solution of bichloride of mercury and glycerine, or Gowland’s lotion.

Source: The Ladies’ Book Of Useful Information