Oleum Camphoratum (Camphorated Oil)

May 10th, 2016

Take of

  • Olive oil, two ounces ;
  • Camphor, half an ounce.

Mix them so that the camphor may be dissolved.

This is a simple solution of camphor in fixed oil, and is an excellent application to local pains from whatever cause, and to glandular swellings.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

Infusion of Rhubarb

April 18th, 2016

Take of

  • Rhubarb, half an ounce ;
  • Boiling water, eight ounces ;
  • Spirit of cinnamon, one ounce.

Macerate the rhubarb in a close vessel with the water, for twelve hours ; then having added the spirit, strain the liquor.

This appears to be one of the best preparations of rhubarb, when designed as a purgative; water extracting its virtue more effectually than either vinous or spiritous menstrua.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

Linseed Oil with Lime

March 23rd, 2016

Take of:

  • Linseed oil,
  • Lime water,

of each equal parts. Mix them.

This liniment is extremely useful in cases of scalds or burns, being singularly efficacious in preventing, if applied in time, the inflammation subsequent to burns or scalds; or even in removing it, after it has come on.

It is also a species of soap, and might be called Soap of Lime, although it probably contains a great excess of oil.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

Infusion of Foxglove

March 21st, 2016

Take of

  • Dried leaves of foxglove, one drachm;
  • Boiling water, eight ounces;
  • Spirit of cinnamon, one ounce.

Macerate for four hours, and filter.

This is the infusion so highly recommended by Withering. Half an ounce, or an ounce, of it, may be taken twice a day in dropsical complaints. The spirit of cinnamon is added to improve its flavour, and to counteract its sedative effects.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan

The Burning of Sponge, Burnt Sponge

March 13th, 2016

Cut the sponge in pieces, and bruise it, so as to free it from small stones; burn it in a close iron vessel, until it becomes black and friable; afterwards reduce it to a very fine powder.

This medicine has been in use for a considerable time, and employed against scrofulous disorders and cutaneous foulnesses, in doses of a scruple and upwards. Its virtues probably depend on the presence of a little alkali. It also contains charcoal; and its use may be entirely superseded by these substances, which may be obtained in other manners, at a much cheaper rate.

Source: The Edinburgh New Dispensatory, Andrew Duncan