Pregnancy, Bouillon or Broth for

May 2nd, 2008

“Was weak and generally run down. Family physician warned me I would never survive the birth of another child. I bought each day several beef bones and boiled them for three hours. I also bought chicken feet, scalded them and scraped them until the outside skin peeled off, then boiled the chicken feet with the bones. Skim surface from time to time. I would then heat up a raw egg in a glass and fill glass with this broth and drink it warm.” This lady would take a glass whenever thirsty or six or seven times a day. She increased in strength immediately, within a year was the mother of a healthy baby girl now nineteen years old and believes her life was saved by the above. Anyone will find this worth trying.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Pregnancy, A Great Aid for

April 16th, 2008

“Soothing syrup or Mother’s friend, while pregnant. Two ounces each of cramp bark, blue cohosh, slippery elm, raspberry leaves, squaw vine, orange peel and bitter root. Simmer gently in sufficient water to keep herbs covered for two hours, strain and steep gently down to one quart. Let it stand to cool, then add one cup granulated sugar, and four ounces alcohol. Dose.– One tablespoonful two or three times a day for several weeks before the birth of the child. This has been thoroughly tried and causes an easy birth where difficulty has been expected.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Aqua Gentianæ compositæ

January 27th, 2008

Or Gentian Water compound.

College. Take of Gentian roots sliced, one pound and a half, the leaves and flowers of Centaury the less, of each four ounces, steep them eight days in twelve pounds of white Wine, then distil them in an alembick.

Culpeper. It conduces to preservation from ill air, and pestilential fevers: it opens obstructions of the liver, and helps such as they say are liver-grown; it eases pains in the stomach, helps digestion, and eases such as have pains in their bones by ill lodging abroad in the cold, it provokes appetite, and is exceeding good for the yellow jaundice, as also for prickings or stitches in the sides: it provokes the menses, and expels both birth and placenta: it is naught for pregnant women. If there be no fever, you may take a spoonful by itself; if there be, you may, if you please, mix it with some cooler medicine appropriated to the same use you would give it for.

Source: The Complete Herbal and English Physician Enlarged, Nicholas Culpeper