The Melancholy Water

June 21st, 2015

Take of the Flowers of Gilliflowers, four handfuls, Rosemary flowers three handfuls, Damask Rose leaves, Burrage and Bugloss flowers of each one handful, of Balm leaves six handfuls, of Marigold flowers one handful, of Pinks six handfuls, of Cinamon grosly beaten, half an ounce, two Nutmegs beaten, Anniseeds beaten one ounce, three peniworth of Saffron; put them all into a Pottle of Sack, and let them stand two days, stirring them sometimes well together; then distil them in an ordinary Still, and let it drop into a Glass wherein there is two grains of Musk, and eight ounces of white Sugar Candy, and some Leaf-Gold; take of this Water three times a week fasting, two spoonfuls at a time, and ofter if you find need; distil with soft fire; this is good for Women in Child-bed if they are faint.

Source: The Queen-like Closet or Rich Cabinet, Hannah Wolley

Ingredient: Castor Oil

May 19th, 2015

This oil is a valuable aperient; for whilst, in doses of from half an ounce to an ounce, it thoroughly evacuates the bowels, it does so with little irritation; hence it is especially useful in inflammatory cases, or where there is spasm, or where all increased action of the system is particularly to be avoided. From its quick and mild operation, it is particularly adapted for children, and females during pregnancy. It is also the best purgative that can be employed in that affection of the bowels knowm by the names of colica pictonum, or painter’s colic, the Devonshire colic, and the dry bellyache; and it is the more useful in that disease, as it may be joined with opium and other narcotics without having its purgative properties lessened. For the same reason castor oil is advantageously given in calculous affections. It has also been regarded by some continental physicians as peculiarly well suited for expelling the tape-worm. It is likewise considered the best purgative, when properly administered, for combating habitual costiveness. For this purpose a large dose must first be given in the morning, and the use of the oil continued for some weeks, gradually diminishing the dose daily, until half a tea-spoonful only is taken; on the discontinuance of which, the bowels continue to be relieved without further assistance. One disadvantage attending the use of this oil is its tendency to excite vomiting, but this is counteracted by combining it with some aromatic. The best modes of exhibiting it in general have been much canvassed; it is given floating on water with a small quantity of brandy poured over it, and when this can be swallowed at once, there is no better mode; but as this cannot always be done, it may be given with success in coffee or mutton-broth, or suspended in water by the intervention of mucilage or yolk of egg, according to the taste of the patient. Upon the whole, castor oil is a purgative of great value, and one whose operation, as it is in daily use, should be well understood.

Source: A Companion To The Medicine Chest, John Savory.

Pregnancy, Bouillon or Broth for

May 2nd, 2008

“Was weak and generally run down. Family physician warned me I would never survive the birth of another child. I bought each day several beef bones and boiled them for three hours. I also bought chicken feet, scalded them and scraped them until the outside skin peeled off, then boiled the chicken feet with the bones. Skim surface from time to time. I would then heat up a raw egg in a glass and fill glass with this broth and drink it warm.” This lady would take a glass whenever thirsty or six or seven times a day. She increased in strength immediately, within a year was the mother of a healthy baby girl now nineteen years old and believes her life was saved by the above. Anyone will find this worth trying.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Pregnancy, A Great Aid for

April 16th, 2008

“Soothing syrup or Mother’s friend, while pregnant. Two ounces each of cramp bark, blue cohosh, slippery elm, raspberry leaves, squaw vine, orange peel and bitter root. Simmer gently in sufficient water to keep herbs covered for two hours, strain and steep gently down to one quart. Let it stand to cool, then add one cup granulated sugar, and four ounces alcohol. Dose.– One tablespoonful two or three times a day for several weeks before the birth of the child. This has been thoroughly tried and causes an easy birth where difficulty has been expected.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Nausea of Pregnancy, Menthol and Sweet Oil for

April 12th, 2008

“Vomiting and nausea of pregnancy; a twenty per cent solution of menthol in sweet oil; use ten drops on sugar when nausea appears.” The menthol acts on the stomach and quiets it. This will be found very beneficial.

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter