Ingredient: Castor Oil

May 19th, 2015

This oil is a valuable aperient; for whilst, in doses of from half an ounce to an ounce, it thoroughly evacuates the bowels, it does so with little irritation; hence it is especially useful in inflammatory cases, or where there is spasm, or where all increased action of the system is particularly to be avoided. From its quick and mild operation, it is particularly adapted for children, and females during pregnancy. It is also the best purgative that can be employed in that affection of the bowels knowm by the names of colica pictonum, or painter’s colic, the Devonshire colic, and the dry bellyache; and it is the more useful in that disease, as it may be joined with opium and other narcotics without having its purgative properties lessened. For the same reason castor oil is advantageously given in calculous affections. It has also been regarded by some continental physicians as peculiarly well suited for expelling the tape-worm. It is likewise considered the best purgative, when properly administered, for combating habitual costiveness. For this purpose a large dose must first be given in the morning, and the use of the oil continued for some weeks, gradually diminishing the dose daily, until half a tea-spoonful only is taken; on the discontinuance of which, the bowels continue to be relieved without further assistance. One disadvantage attending the use of this oil is its tendency to excite vomiting, but this is counteracted by combining it with some aromatic. The best modes of exhibiting it in general have been much canvassed; it is given floating on water with a small quantity of brandy poured over it, and when this can be swallowed at once, there is no better mode; but as this cannot always be done, it may be given with success in coffee or mutton-broth, or suspended in water by the intervention of mucilage or yolk of egg, according to the taste of the patient. Upon the whole, castor oil is a purgative of great value, and one whose operation, as it is in daily use, should be well understood.

Source: A Companion To The Medicine Chest, John Savory.

News: Forbidden fruit adds both health benefits and culinary delight

January 23rd, 2008

“Pomegranates have been signs of fertility, rebirth and health since they were first cultivated around 2000 B.C.

Ancient Egyptian mythology and the Old Testament both mention these small red fruits. And some scholars believe that Eve actually ate a pomegranate in the Garden of Eden, not an apple. Originally from the Himalayan Mountains, the fruits have been used in traditional medicine for centuries.”

Full story: The Monitor, 16th January 2008

Tape Worm, Successful Remedy for Children or Adult

January 15th, 2008

“Turpentine 15 drops
Castor Oil 1 teaspoonful
Milk 1 teacupful

Mix and for adult take at one dose. If not successful repeat the next day. For child under ten years, one-half the quantity.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Tape Worms, Pumpkin Seed Tea for

January 7th, 2008

“One pint pumpkin seeds skinned and steeped. Add water enough to make three tumblers. Take one tumbler every half hour, then a good dose of castor oil. The worm will come with oil. My mother helped prepare the seeds and saw the tapeworm which came from a woman as a result of this dose.”

Source: Mother’s Remedies: Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remidies from Mothers of the United States and Canada, T. J. Ritter

Definition: Vermifuge

January 1st, 2008

A vermifuge is a substance which causes the expulsion of internal parasites — usually worms — from the body.